Saudi Arabian Airlines starts daily flights to Turkey’s Izmir

Saudi Arabian Airlines (Saudia) will fly its first direct flight to Tukrey’s Izmir on Wednesday. (AFP)
Updated 08 May 2018
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Saudi Arabian Airlines starts daily flights to Turkey’s Izmir

RIYADH: Saudi Arabian Airlines (Saudia) will fly its first direct flight to Tukrey’s Izmir on Wednesday, a new destination added to its seasonal service.
A daily service four-times-weekly from Jeddah to Izmir will start on Wednesday, according to the Saudi Press Agency.
And starting on June 10, Saudia will be running flights three-times weekly from Riyadh.
Flight SV251 will depart King Abdul Aziz International Airport in Jeddah at 10:10 local time Wednesday morning. The expected arrival time in Izmir is 13:35.
The return flight SV250 will take off at 15:05 Wednesday afternoon, to arrive in Jeddah at 18:30 in the evening.
The airline will operate the route with an Airbus A320 aircraft in a two-class configuration of 20 seats in business class and 96 seats in guest class (economy).
The flight duration from Jeddah to Izmir is three hours and 25 minutes nonstop, and three hours 55 minutes from Riyadh.
The Kingdom’s national carrier currently flies to 89 destinations across four continents and operates a fleet of narrow-body and wide-body Airbus and Boeing aircraft.


Tesla plans 7% staff cut as CEO Elon Musk says company must ‘work harder’

Updated 38 min 38 sec ago
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Tesla plans 7% staff cut as CEO Elon Musk says company must ‘work harder’

  • Tesla delivered over 245,000 electric cars and SUVs last year, nearly as many as all previous years combined
  • But its 2018 production fell far short of a goal set nearly three years ago of manufacturing 500,000 vehicles for the year

Saying the road ahead was “very difficult,” Tesla’s CEO Elon Musk said Friday that the company would be cutting its staff by about 7 percent.
The electric car and solar panel maker notified its employees about the staff cuts and other plans in an email posted on Tesla Inc.’s website.
Musk said Tesla hopes to post a “tiny profit” in the current quarter but a 30 percent expansion in its workforce last year was more than it can support.
Tesla’s shares tumbled earlier this month after it cut vehicle prices by $2,000 and announced fourth-quarter sales figures that fell short of Wall Street estimates.
“Our products are too expensive for most people,” Musk said in the memo to Tesla staff, saying the company has to “work harder.”
“Tesla has only been producing cars for about a decade and we’re up against massive, entrenched competitors,” he said.
Musk said in a tweet in October that Tesla, based on Palo Alto, California, had 45,000 employees. A 7 percent cut would involve laying off about 3,150 people.
“We unfortunately have no choice but to reduce full-time employee headcount by approximately 7 percent ... and retain only the most critical temps and contractors,” he said.
The company says it delivered over 245,000 electric cars and SUVs last year, nearly as many as all previous years combined. But its 2018 production fell far short of a goal set nearly three years ago of manufacturing 500,000 vehicles for the year. That goal was announced in May of 2016 based on advance orders for its mid-range Model 3, which Musk said sells for $44,000.
Musk said Tesla plans to ramp up production of the Model 3, “as we need to reach more customers who can afford our vehicles.”
“Attempting to build affordable clean energy products at scale necessarily requires extreme effort and relentless creativity,” he said in the memo, “but succeeding in our mission is essential to ensure that the future is good, so we must do everything we can to advance the cause.”
Tesla broke ground earlier this month for a factory in Shanghai, its first outside the US. Musk said it plans to begin production there of the Model 3 and a planned crossover by the year’s end.
Tesla and other global automakers including General Motors Co., Volkswagen and Nissan Motor Corp. are pouring billions of dollars into manufacturing electric vehicles in China.