Military chief inaugurates Pak-Afghan border fencing in Balochistan

General Qamar Javed Bajwa, Chief of Army Staff (COAS), inaugurated work on border fencing along the Balochistan portion of Pak-Afghan border. (Photo courtesy: ISPR)
Updated 09 May 2018
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Military chief inaugurates Pak-Afghan border fencing in Balochistan

  • General Qamar Javed Bajwa said the fencing will check cross-border movement of terrorists
  • He highlighted special arrangements made to facilitate bilateral economic activity and legal movement

ISLAMABAD: Pakistan’s Army Chief General Qamar Javed Bajwa inaugurated work on border fencing along the Balochistan portion of Pak-Afghan border at Panjpai, on Tuesday.
Chief Minister Balochistan Abdul Qadoos Bazinjo and interior minister Sarfraz Bugti were also at the inauguration.
Pakistan and Afghanistan share a border of nearly 2,600 kilometers. In the middle of last year, Pakistan began to build fences along its porous border with Afghanistan to stop illegal cross border movement, particularly by militants, and to enable effective monitoring of the border.
In first phase, fences were erected in the Bajaur, Mohmand and Khyber tribal regions and now the work has started in Pakistan’s Southwestern province of Balochistan.
General Bajwa thanked tribal leaders and locals for their support in maintaining security.
“The fencing will check cross border movement of terrorists,” General Bajwa said, adding: “Special arrangements have been made to facilitate bilateral economic activity and legal movement in any way or form through designated crossing points.”
During the visit to Balochistan, Gen Bajwa also inaugurated the Quetta Safe City Project in the province capital city, after a five-year delay to the work going ahead.
General also interacted with Quetta university students. He said that Pakistan has rejected terrorism and has achieved greater peace after great sacrifices by Armed Forces, which had been backed by the whole nation.
“Some elements are trying to influence the minds of our youth at this stage to create anarchy and dissatisfaction in the society,” General Bajwa said.
He added: “It is for everyone to ensure that they abide by law of the land and remain within the bounds of constitution.”


Ninth lawmaker quits Britain’s opposition Labour Party

Updated 53 min 25 sec ago
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Ninth lawmaker quits Britain’s opposition Labour Party

  • Corbyn, a supporter of Palestinian rights and critic of the Israeli government, has previously been accused by some of failing to tackle anti-Semitism in the party. He denies the allegation

LONDON: British lawmaker Ian Austin resigned from the opposition Labour Party on Friday, the ninth person to do so this week, saying it was “broken” and had been taken over by the “hard left.”

Austin said he was appalled at the treatment of Jewish lawmakers who had taken a stand against anti-Semitism and that the “the party is tougher on the people complaining about anti-Semitism than it is on the anti-Semites.”

“The Labour Party has been my life, so this has been the hardest decision I have ever had to take, but I have to be honest and the truth is that I have become ashamed of the Labour Party under (leader) Jeremy Corbyn,” he told the Express and Star newspaper.

“I could never ask local people to make Jeremy Corbyn Prime Minister.”

Corbyn has promised to drive anti-Semitism out of the party.

Austin said he did not currently have any plans to join The Independent Group in parliament, launched by seven of his former Labour colleagues on Monday and since joined by an eighth as well as three former members of the governing Conservatives.

A Labour lawmaker since 2005 and a former government minister, Austin supports Prime Minister Theresa May’s Brexit deal and is not in favor of holding a second referendum, putting him at odds with the other Independent Group members.