Emirates Global Aluminium likely to delay float after market turmoil

EGA, which produces 2.6 million tons of cast metal a year and is the third-largest producer of primary aluminum outside China, announced plans to float last year. (Courtesy EGA)
Updated 10 May 2018
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Emirates Global Aluminium likely to delay float after market turmoil

LONDON/ABU DHABI: Emirates Global Aluminium’s (EGA) stock market listing is likely to slip to 2019 because of turmoil in global aluminum markets after the US imposed sanctions on Russian aluminum group Rusal, three sources familiar with the deal said.
“The IPO (initial public offering) is delayed to 2019 due to market conditions,” one of the sources said.
EGA, which produces 2.6 million tons of cast metal a year and is the third-largest producer of primary aluminum outside China, announced plans to float last year.
But aluminum prices have been volatile since Washington, in response to what it called “malign activities” by Russia, imposed sanctions on Rusal and shareholder Oleg Deripaska. Benchmark prices on the London Metal Exchange surged to their highest in seven years.
They dropped back by around 9 percent when the US Treasury Department said Rusal’s American customers would have more time to comply with the sanctions. The US Treasury also said it would consider lifting them if Russian tycoon Oleg Deripaska ceded control of the company.
In April, just after the sanctions on several Russian entities took hold, EGA’s chief executive said the company was on track for a listing in the second half of 2018.
“We maintain what we’ve said earlier that it will be 2018, subject to market conditions and we continue to monitor the markets,” an EGA spokesman said on Thursday.
EGA’s IPO would be the second major listing by a state company in the United Arab Emirates since Abu Dhabi National Oil Co. (ADNOC) listed shares in its retail petrol station business in 2017.
The sources said no final decision had been taken on whether the listing would take place in Abu Dhabi or Dubai, while a secondary listing in London was still a possibility. About 10 to 15 percent of the company is likely to be floated, they said.
Sources had previously said that Bank of America Merrill Lynch, Goldman Sachs and J.P. Morgan had been hired to run the IPO.
EGA, owned by Mubadala and Investment Corp. of Dubai, was created in 2013 when state-owned companies Dubai Aluminium and Abu Dhabi’s Emirates Aluminium merged. Its enterprise value was put at $15 billion at the time.
In February, EGA reported a 59 percent rise in 2017 profit to 3.3 billion dirhams ($900 million) on stronger aluminum prices and record production levels.


US trade negotiators to visit China for fresh round of talks

Updated 21 March 2019
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US trade negotiators to visit China for fresh round of talks

  • Washington and Beijing are battling over the final shape of a trade deal
  • American officials are demanding profound changes to Chinese industrial policy

BEIJING: US Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin will visit China on March 28-29 for a fresh round of talks aimed at resolving the bruising trade war, the Chinese commerce ministry said Thursday.
After their visit, Chinese Vice Premier Liu He will head to the United States in April to continue the negotiations, ministry spokesman Gao Feng said at a press briefing.
Washington and Beijing are battling over the final shape of a trade deal, with American officials demanding profound changes to Chinese industrial policy.
President Donald Trump warned Wednesday that US tariffs on Chinese imports could remain in place for a “substantial period,” dampening hopes that an agreement would see them lifted soon.
Over the last eight months, the United States and China have slapped tariffs on more than $360 billion in two-way goods trade, weighing on the manufacturing sectors in both countries.
On Friday, China’s rubber-stamp parliament approved a foreign investment law to strengthen protections for intellectual property — a central US grievance — but critics said the bill was rammed through without sufficient time for input from businesses.