Royal retreat of Windsor prepares to party for Harry, Meghan

A party atmosphere is developing in the English city of Windsor, with tens of thousands of visitors expected in the city on Prince Harry and Meghan Markle's wedding day. (AP)
Updated 11 May 2018
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Royal retreat of Windsor prepares to party for Harry, Meghan

  • Prince Harry and American actress Meghan Markle will get married in Windsor next week.
  • Tens of thousands of visitors are expected on the couple’s wedding day on May 19.

WINDSOR: A party atmosphere is already developing in the English town of Windsor, where Prince Harry and American actress Meghan Markle will get married next week.
The town, long known for the magnificent Windsor Castle that dominates the skyline, has been prettied up for the big event, with tens of thousands of visitors expected on the couple’s wedding day on May 19.
Fevered preparations are underway. Many roads have been repaved, street signs are being repainted, storefronts decked out with life-size cutouts of Harry and Markle, and shoppers are being lured by all kinds of souvenirs, including tattoos with a royal wedding theme.


What We Are Reading Today: Explain Me This by Adele E. Goldberg

Updated 22 January 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: Explain Me This by Adele E. Goldberg

  • Adele Goldberg explores how these creative but constrained language skills emerge from a combination of general cognitive mechanisms and experience

We use words and phrases creatively to express ourselves in ever-changing contexts, readily extending language constructions in new ways. Yet native speakers also implicitly know when a creative and easily interpretable formulation — such as “Explain me this” or “She considered to go” — doesn’t sound quite right. 

In this incisive book, Adele Goldberg explores how these creative but constrained language skills emerge from a combination of general cognitive mechanisms and experience.

Shedding critical light on an enduring linguistic paradox, Goldberg demonstrates how words and abstract constructions are generalized and constrained in the same ways, according a review on the Princeton University Press website. When learning language, we record partially abstracted tokens of language within the high-dimensional conceptual space that is used when we speak or listen. Our implicit knowledge of language includes dimensions related to form, function, and social context.