Iraqi journalist who threw shoes at Bush stands for parliament

A supporter poses for a selfie with Muntazer Al-Zaidi, left, an Iraqi journalist famous for throwing a shoe at former US president George W. Bush in 2008, during a rally in Baghdad. (AFP)
Updated 11 May 2018
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Iraqi journalist who threw shoes at Bush stands for parliament

BAGHDAD: An Iraqi journalist who threw his shoes at US President George W. Bush during a news conference a decade ago is standing for parliament, campaigning against corruption and the sectarianism that has plagued his country.
TV correspondent Muntazer Al-Zaidi became famous across Iraq and the Middle East after throwing his footwear at Bush during a news conference in Baghdad in 2008, shouting “This is a farewell kiss from the Iraqi people, you dog!”
Bush ducked twice as the shoes sailed over his head. Zaidi served six months in prison for assaulting a visiting leader.
Today, Zaidi is standing for parliament as a member of the movement of firebrand Shiite cleric Moqtada Al-Sadr, whose militia waged a violent campaign against the US military during its occupation of Iraq, but who has lately redefined himself as an opponent of militant sectarianism.
Sadr and his followers argue that the sectarian and ethnic parties representing Iraq’s Shiites, Sunnis and Kurds, dominant since the fall of Saddam Hussein in 2003, have abused their power and looted the state. The Sadrists have formed an unlikely alliance with the Communists and other secular groups.
“The main real purpose and reason behind my nomination is to get rid of the corrupt, and to expel them from our country,” Zaidi said in an interview.
“I was a journalist when I hurled a shoe at Bush. Before that event and I was, and still am, against the occupation and corruption. But the corrupt aren’t listening to people who demand that they give up corruption. So I decided to enter the political process.”
Zaidi said he has made a point of omitting from his posters any images of the shoe-throwing incident that made him famous.
“I refused to have any images of me from that incident used for my election campaign. I rely on the present, what I can bring to Iraqis. I don’t want an emotional (vote), I want people to be convinced (by my policies),” he said.
Zaidi’s shoe-throwing divided opinion in Iraq at the time. Some saw it as sticking up for the country; others as a crude gesture that undermined Iraq’s dignity.
Local residents erected a giant concrete monument of a shoe in Zaidi’s honor outside an orphanage in the city of Tikrit in 2009, but it was taken down a day later by the municipal authorities.
A decade on, reaction to his candidacy in the election this weekend has been similarly mixed.
“I hope he wins. He was jealously protecting his country. What he did was correct: the country was under occupation,” said Mohannad Ibrahim, 26-year-old supermarket cashier in Baghdad.
Journalist Haider Qassem, 41, disagreed. “He is not fit to be a candidate, he is not even fit to be a low-ranking civil servant. He has no manners. A journalist should be cultured. You can’t just throw shoes.”


Iran says Revolutionary Guard shoots down US drone

Updated 15 min 2 sec ago
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Iran says Revolutionary Guard shoots down US drone

  • The attacks come against the backdrop of heightened tensions between the US and Iran
  • Capt. Bill Urban, a US Central Command spokesman, declined to comment when asked if an American drone was shot down

TEHRAN, Iran: Iran’s Revolutionary Guard said Thursday it shot down a US drone amid heightened tensions between Tehran and Washington over its collapsing nuclear deal. The US military declined to immediately comment.
The reported shootdown of the RQ-4 Global Hawk comes after the US military previously alleged Iran fired a missile at another drone last week that responded to the attack on two oil tankers near the Gulf of Oman. The US blames Iran for the attack on the ships, which Tehran denies.
The attacks come against the backdrop of heightened tensions between the US and Iran following President Donald Trump’s decision to withdraw from Tehran’s nuclear deal with world powers a year ago.
Iran recently has quadrupled its production of low-enriched uranium and threatened to boost its enrichment closer to weapons-grade levels, trying to pressure Europe for new terms to the 2015 deal.
In recent weeks, the US has sped an aircraft carrier to the Mideast and deployed additional troops to the tens of thousands already in the region. Mysterious attacks also have targeted oil tankers as Iranian-allied Houthi rebels launched bomb-laden drones into Saudi Arabia.
All this has raised fears that a miscalculation or further rise in tensions could push the US and Iran into an open conflict, some 40 years after Tehran’s Islamic Revolution.
Iran’s paramilitary Revolutionary Guard, which answers only to Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, said it shot down the drone Thursday morning when it entered Iranian airspace near the Kouhmobarak district in southern Iran’s Hormozgan province. Kouhmobarak is some 1,200 kilometers (750 miles) southeast of Tehran and is close to the Strait of Hormuz.
Iran’s state-run IRNA news agency, citing the paramilitary Revolutionary Guard, identified the drone as an RQ-4 Global Hawk.
Capt. Bill Urban, a US Central Command spokesman, declined to comment when asked if an American drone was shot down.
However, he told The Associated Press: “There was no drone over Iranian territory.”