UAE-based company keen to resolve Balochistan water crisis

This file photo shows Pakistani children pushing wheelbarrows loaded with jerry cans full of drinking water from a state-run water tap on the outskirts of Quetta on March 17, 2015. (AFP)
Updated 11 May 2018
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UAE-based company keen to resolve Balochistan water crisis

  • CEO expresses interest in investment, signing MoU
  • Chief Minister of Balochistan Abdul Quddus Bizenjo said the provincial government is taking “effective measures” to resolve water scarcity

QUETTA: The CEO of the International Climate Global Trading Co. (ICGTC) on Thursday expressed an interest in investing in Balochistan’s dilapidated water sector during a meeting with the province’s Chief Minister Abdul Quddus Bizenjo.
“The company is interested in investing in the water sector, and is willing to ink a memorandum of understanding with the Balochistan government,” said Maxim Lavrov.
Bizenjo said the provincial government is taking “effective measures” to resolve water scarcity. 
“There is a need to develop the water sector… so that the water in dams can reach its previous level,” he added.
Lauding the UAE-based company’s interest in the water sector, Bizenjo assured the visiting delegation that the provincial government will provide its full support.
On Wednesday, Pakistan’s Chief Justice Saqib Nisar summoned former chief ministers of Balochistan to explain what measures had been taken to end water scarcity in the province. 
Observing that some water sources had dried up, Nisar said his visit to Balochistan’s capital Quetta had left him “dismayed,” adding: “The people of the province lack political vitality.”


Widespread blackout hits Venezuela, government blames ‘electromagnetic attack’

People pour to the streets in Caracas on July 22, 2019 as the capital and other parts of Venezuela are being hit by a massive power cut. (AFP)
Updated 23 July 2019
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Widespread blackout hits Venezuela, government blames ‘electromagnetic attack’

  • Venezuelan Information Minister Jorge Rodriguez said the outage on Monday was caused by an “electromagnetic attack,” without providing evidence

CARACAS: More than half of Venezuela’s 23 states lost power on Monday, according to Reuters witnesses and reports on social media, a blackout the government blamed on an “electromagnetic attack.”
It was the first blackout to include the capital, Caracas, since March, when the government blamed the opposition and United States for a series of power outages that left millions of people without running water and telecommunications.
The blackouts exacerbated an economic crisis that has halved the size of the economy.
Venezuelan Information Minister Jorge Rodriguez said the outage on Monday was caused by an “electromagnetic attack,” without providing evidence. He added that authorities were in the process of re-establishing service.
Power returned for about 10 minutes to parts of southeastern Bolivar state, site of the Guri hydroelectric dam — the source of most of Venezuela’s generation — but went out again, according to a Reuters witness. Electricity was still out throughout Caracas.
“It terrifies me to think we are facing a national blackout again,” said Maria Luisa Rivero, a 45-year-old business owner from the city of Valencia, in the central state of Carabobo.
“The first thing I did was run to freeze my food so that it does not go bad like it did like the last time in March. It costs a lot to buy food just to lose it,” she said.
The oil-rich country’s hyperinflationary economic crisis has led to widespread shortages in food and medicine, prompting over 4 million Venezuelans to leave the country.
Venezuela’s national power grid has fallen into disrepair after years of inadequate investment and maintenance, according to the opposition and power experts.
“These blackouts are catastrophic,” said 51-year-old janitor Bernardina Guerra, who lives in Caracas. “I live in the eastern part of the city and there the lights go out every day. Each day things are worse.”