UAE-based company keen to resolve Balochistan water crisis

This file photo shows Pakistani children pushing wheelbarrows loaded with jerry cans full of drinking water from a state-run water tap on the outskirts of Quetta on March 17, 2015. (AFP)
Updated 11 May 2018
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UAE-based company keen to resolve Balochistan water crisis

  • CEO expresses interest in investment, signing MoU
  • Chief Minister of Balochistan Abdul Quddus Bizenjo said the provincial government is taking “effective measures” to resolve water scarcity

QUETTA: The CEO of the International Climate Global Trading Co. (ICGTC) on Thursday expressed an interest in investing in Balochistan’s dilapidated water sector during a meeting with the province’s Chief Minister Abdul Quddus Bizenjo.
“The company is interested in investing in the water sector, and is willing to ink a memorandum of understanding with the Balochistan government,” said Maxim Lavrov.
Bizenjo said the provincial government is taking “effective measures” to resolve water scarcity. 
“There is a need to develop the water sector… so that the water in dams can reach its previous level,” he added.
Lauding the UAE-based company’s interest in the water sector, Bizenjo assured the visiting delegation that the provincial government will provide its full support.
On Wednesday, Pakistan’s Chief Justice Saqib Nisar summoned former chief ministers of Balochistan to explain what measures had been taken to end water scarcity in the province. 
Observing that some water sources had dried up, Nisar said his visit to Balochistan’s capital Quetta had left him “dismayed,” adding: “The people of the province lack political vitality.”


Version of PM May’s deal can get through parliament: Hunt

Updated 15 December 2018
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Version of PM May’s deal can get through parliament: Hunt

  • May pulled a vote on her deal this week after acknowledging it would be heavily defeated over concerns about the divorce agreement’s “backstop”

LONDON: Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt said on Saturday that the British parliament could back Prime Minister Theresa May’s deal if lawmakers received assurances from the European Union, but warned that a no deal Brexit was still on the table.
May pulled a vote on her deal this week after acknowledging it would be heavily defeated over concerns about the divorce agreement’s “backstop,” an insurance policy designed to avoid any hard land border for Ireland but which critics say could bind Britain to EU rules indefinitely.
“When the dust has settled, the only way we’re going to get this through the House of Commons ... is to have a version of the deal that the government has negotiated,” Hunt told BBC radio.
Following a summit in Brussels on Friday, May said it was possible that the EU could give further guarantees that the backstop would be temporary although the bloc’s other 27 leaders told her they would not renegotiate the treaty.
Hunt said the EU was likely to make concessions to avoid Britain leaving without any deal, a scenario that both sides say would be highly damaging for business and their economies.
“The EU cannot be sure that if they choose not to be helpful and flexible ... that we would not end up with no deal,” Hunt said. “We cannot in these negotiations take no deal off the table. I don’t think the EU could be remotely sure that if we don’t find a way through this we wouldn’t end up with no deal.”
The Times newspaper reported on Saturday that most of May’s senior ministerial team thought her deal was dead and were discussing a range of options including a second referendum.
“Brexit is in danger of getting stuck – and that is something that should worry us all,” pensions minister Amber Rudd wrote in the Daily Mail newspaper.
“If MPs (lawmakers) dig in against the Prime Minister’s deal and then hunker down in their different corners, none with a majority, the country will face serious trouble.”