What We Are Watching: Syria: The World’s War

Updated 12 May 2018

What We Are Watching: Syria: The World’s War

Lyse Doucet, the veteran BBC journalist, was in Daraa in 2011 to cover the anti-government protests against Bashar Assad. Few would have predicted at the time that those events in the southern city, now referred to as the cradle of the uprising, would have escalated into seven devastating years of civil war, killing half a million people and leaving the country in ruins. 

Doucet has reported from the country extensively during that time and in this two-part documentary she tracks and explains the main arcs of the conflict from the early protests filled with hope through to some of the darkest episodes that have unfolded in the region since the Arab Spring. “Syria: The World’s War” includes interviews with officials on both sides as it explains the key decisions made as the conflict escalated. 

It also features harrowing testimony from ordinary Syrians, who have suffered the most, as well as haunting footage of Assad’s worst atrocities.

 


Bollywood to make movie on Pakistan air strikes

Updated 23 August 2019

Bollywood to make movie on Pakistan air strikes

  • The new movie is set to be produced by Vivek Oberoi
  • Kashmir has been divided between India and Pakistan since the end of British colonial rule in 1947

NEW DELHI: Bollywood is to make a movie on the "true story" of Indian air strikes on Pakistan this year, its producer said Friday, the latest patriotic film to hit the silver screen.
The February 26 attack took place after a suicide bombing claimed by a militant group based in Pakistan killed 40 Indian troops on February 14 in Indian-controlled Kashmir.
Pakistan then carried out its own raid over the de-facto border in Kashmir before the two nuclear-armed countries stepped back from the brink of another conflict.
India said that in the raid, its aircraft successfully attacked a training camp at Balakot and killed "a very large number" of "terrorists", but doubts have been raised about its efficacy.
The new movie is set to be produced by Vivek Oberoi, who starred in a flattering biopic of Prime Minister Narendra Modi, the release of which was delayed so as not to interfere with this year's election.
It will also tell the story of handlebar-moustached Abhinandan Varthaman, an Indian pilot who was shot down in the raid and then handed over by Pakistan, becoming a national hero.
"As a proud Indian, a patriot, and a member of the film fraternity, it's my duty to highlight what our armed forces are truly capable of," Oberoi was quoted as saying by Indian media.
"This film is a powerful tool to underline the achievements of brave officers like Wing Commander Abhinandan, who went behind the enemy lines and did what makes every Indian proud of them," said Vivek.
Kashmir has been divided between India and Pakistan since the end of British colonial rule in 1947. Both claim the Himalayan territory in full and have fought two wars over it.
Earlier this month India stripped its part of the region's autonomy, sending tens of thousands of extra troops and imposing a lockdown and a communications blackout that on Friday entered its 19th day.