What We Are Watching: Syria: The World’s War

Updated 12 May 2018
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What We Are Watching: Syria: The World’s War

Lyse Doucet, the veteran BBC journalist, was in Daraa in 2011 to cover the anti-government protests against Bashar Assad. Few would have predicted at the time that those events in the southern city, now referred to as the cradle of the uprising, would have escalated into seven devastating years of civil war, killing half a million people and leaving the country in ruins. 

Doucet has reported from the country extensively during that time and in this two-part documentary she tracks and explains the main arcs of the conflict from the early protests filled with hope through to some of the darkest episodes that have unfolded in the region since the Arab Spring. “Syria: The World’s War” includes interviews with officials on both sides as it explains the key decisions made as the conflict escalated. 

It also features harrowing testimony from ordinary Syrians, who have suffered the most, as well as haunting footage of Assad’s worst atrocities.

 


What We Are Reading Today: Revolutionizing the Sciences by Peter Dear

Updated 16 February 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: Revolutionizing the Sciences by Peter Dear

  • The book reflects on the origins of scientific practice in early modern Europe

This thoroughly revised third edition of an award-winning book offers a keen insight into how the scientific revolution happened and why. Covering central scientific figures, including Copernicus, Kepler, Galileo, Newton, and Bacon, this new edition features greater treatment of alchemy and associated craft activities to reflect trends in current scholarship.

The book reflects on the origins of scientific practice in early modern Europe. Peter Dear traces the revolution in thought that changed the natural world from something to be contemplated into something to be used, says a review on the Princeton University Press website.

Concise and readable, this book is ideal for students who are studying the scientific revolution and its impact on the early modern world. The first edition was the winner of the Watson Davis and Helen Miles Davis Prize of the History of Science Society.