East Timor PM urges calm as voters await election result

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PM Alkatiri talks to journalists after casting his vote in a polling station in Dili's Farol neighborhood on Saturday, May 12, 2018. (AN Photo)
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East Timor Prime Minister Mari Alkatiri arrives at a polling station in Dili's Farol neighborhood to vote in parliamentary elections on Saturday, May 12, 2018. (AN Photo)
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An East Timorese voter dips his finger in ink at a polling station in Dili's Farol neighborhood on Saturday, May 12, 2018. (AN Photo)
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An East Timorese voter shows his inked finger after casting his ballot to vote for members of parliament at a polling station in Dili's Farol neighborhood on Saturday, May 12, 2018. (AN Photo)
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An East Timorese voter shows his inked finger after casting his ballot to vote for members of parliament at a polling station in Dili's Farol neighborhood on Saturday, May 12, 2018. (AN Photo)
Updated 12 May 2018
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East Timor PM urges calm as voters await election result

  • Ballot-counting is still underway in the former Portuguese colony, but two political giants have expressed confidence that their respective party and coalition will win.
  • Official results will be announced on May 28 after verification from the High Court.

DILI: East Timor’s Prime Minister Mari Alkatiri has urged his people to remain calm after they voted on Saturday for MPs who will determine a new prime minister and form a majority government to execute much-needed development programs in one of the world’s poorest countries.
“I appeal for the people to be calm, and for politicians and political parties to accept the results, because it was a very free and fair election. Whoever is defeated, it’s the people who really win the election,” Alkatiri told Arab News.
Ballot-counting is still underway in the former Portuguese colony, but two political giants have expressed confidence that their respective party and coalition will win.
Alkatiri headed a minority government that collapsed after a three-party coalition led by former President and former Prime Minister Xanana Gusmao refused to approve the government’s budget.
Alkatiri said he is confident that his party will win more than 30 out of 65 seats in Parliament. His Fretilin party narrowly won the previous election in July 2017 by securing 23 seats.
“We’re already the winner,” he said after casting his vote. “Fretilin never lost a single election throughout its history.”
If his party wins, Alkatiri said the next government will work “to get poor people out of poverty. This is my target for the next five years.”
Every aspect of development is crucial, but what East Timorese need most are clean water, infrastructure and community housing.
Gusmao said he is confident his coalition will get more than the 35 seats it secured in last year’s election.
There are signs of electoral fraud, such as ink that washes out quickly and people who voted twice in different places, he added. “In some places, there were fewer ballot papers than registered voters,” he told Arab News.
A spokesman for Gusmao’s Alliance for Change and Progress (AMP), Tiago Farmento, said there are reports that six supporters’ homes were burnt down in Oecusse, an East Timor exclave surrounded by Indonesia’s East Nusa Tenggara province.
Luis da Costa Ximenes, an election observer and director of the Dili-based conflict-prevention NGO Belun, told Arab News that the group identified 107 incidents during the one-month campaign period, including verbal abuse on social media from fake accounts.
Alkatiri said the incidents were minor, and the election was held in a very professional way. “Show me one election in the world that is without a single incident,” he added.
There were 784,286 registered voters out of a population of 1.2 million in East Timor, which was annexed by Indonesia for 24 years before it voted for secession in 1999 and gained full independence in 2002. Official results will be announced on May 28 after verification from the High Court.


With 10-year visa, UAE could be new land of opportunity for Indians

Routine day at Dubai International Airport. AN photo
Updated 52 min 42 sec ago
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With 10-year visa, UAE could be new land of opportunity for Indians

  • The ruler of Dubai changed rules to allow foreign investors to fully own companies
  • The Indian banking sector is far more developed in terms of product, technology and the caliber of professionals

NEW DELHI: Indians are likely to “flood” the UAE once its recently announced residency visa rules for students and highly qualified professionals come into place, experts said Tuesday.

Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al-Maktoum, vice president and the prime minister of the UAE, announced on Sunday a 10-year visa for investors, scientists, doctors, engineers, entrepreneurs and innovators, as well as their families.
 As part of the changes, students will get five-year visas and “exceptional” graduates will be eligible for a 10-year visa.  Students currently have to apply to renew their visa each year.
The ruler of Dubai also changed rules to allow foreign investors to fully own companies. So far companies have been required to have a local partner who would hold the majority stake.
 The changes are expected to kick in during the third quarter of this year.
 “The UAE has always welcomed, and always will, innovators and business leaders,” Sheikh Mohammed tweeted as he announced the new rules.
 The UAE, with its proximity to India, high salaries and low taxes, has always been a magnet for Indians. It is home to about 2.6 million Indians who make up roughly 30 percent of the country’s population, according to the Indian Embassy in Abu Dhabi. These numbers are expected to shoot up once the new rules apply.
 “Indians are always looking at new work opportunities anywhere in the world,” said Aradhana Mahna, managing director of Manya Education, a study abroad solutions provider in Delhi.  While the US and the UK have historically been avenues for Indian students looking to study abroad, the number of students applying to those countries have undergone a “sharp decline” since the election of US President Donald Trump — who made protectionist comments during his campaign days and since taking office — and since the UK decided to split with the European Union, Mahna said.
 “Dubai is close to home and that has always made it a preferred destination for Indians. Especially now with the US going down, it will be flooded by Indians,” she added.
Mukesh Bhasin, partner at Career Connect, an executive search firm that focuses on banking, financial services and the insurance sector (BFSI), agreed that the new rules would go a long way in attracting Indian talent.
 “The Indian banking sector is far more developed in terms of product, technology and the caliber of professionals,” he said. “The encouraging visa regime will lead to a lot of interest from Indian BFSI professionals toward Middle East opportunities given the already-existing tax benefits and international-quality lifestyle.”
 Since the collapse in 2008 of Lehman Brothers, most developed markets, including neighboring Singapore and Hong Kong, have cut back on the number of people they are hiring from abroad for their domestic operations. This includes a slowdown in foreign transfers for Indian employees of multinational banks, said Bhasin.