Filmmakers at Cannes debate whether Saudi Arabia needs a film festival 

1 / 9
Saudi filmmaker Haifaa Al Mansur speaks during a panel discussion at the Saudi pavilion of the Cannes Film Festival on Saturday. The other panelists are Spanish director Andres Gomez (third, right) and Abdullah Al-Eyaf, another Saudi filmmaker, center. (Photo by Ammar Abd Rabo)
2 / 9
3 / 9
Saudi filmmaker Abdullah Al-Eyaf speaks during a panel discussion at the Saudi pavilion of the Cannes Film Festival on Saturday. (Photo by Ammar Abd Rabo)
4 / 9
5 / 9
L-R : Screenwriter Hatem Ali, Fadi Ismail, from MBC and Ahmad Al-Maziad, CEO of the General Culture Authority. (Photo by Ammar Abd Rabo)
6 / 9
7 / 9
8 / 9
9 / 9
Panelist Andres Gomez, an Oscar-winning Spanish producer, speaks during a panel discussion at the Saudi pavilion of the Cannes Film Festival on Saturday. (Photo by Ammar Abd Rabo)
Updated 12 May 2018
0

Filmmakers at Cannes debate whether Saudi Arabia needs a film festival 

  • Panelist Andres Gomez, an Oscar-winning Spanish producer, says Saudi talents would benefit more if Saudi films travel outside to other festivals abroad compared to having a festival in Saudi Arabia.
  • Saudi filmmakers Haifaa Al Mansour and Abdullah Al-Eyaf argue that that the Kingdom should have an international film festival that goes beyond the small Saudi Film Festival run by Ahmed M. Almulla in Dammam since 2008.

CANNES, France: Two of Saudi Arabia’s leading filmmakers, Haifaa Al-Mansour and Abdullah Al-Eyaf, appeared on a panel in the Saudi pavilion at the Cannes Film Festival on Saturday, where the topic of debate became whether the country needs an international film festival. 

“I’m not a big fan of film festivals,” said Andres Gomez, an Oscar-winning Spanish producer on the panel. “I think it’s more important that the Saudi films travel outside to other festivals abroad. It’s more important that the pavilion is here in Cannes for the next 50 years than you have a festival in a remote town of Saudi Arabia where filmmakers from all of the world come to show their films. If Saudi films want to be present outside of Saudi Arabia, for example a week in New York, that will be more effective for Saudi films than a festival in Saudi Arabia.”

Last month, the Dubai International Film Festival announced the cancellation of its 2018 edition, promising to come back in a smaller, unspecified form in 2019 and then once every other year. Filmmakers from across the region and world have lamented the loss of the festival.

Both Abdullah Al-Eyaf, director of the documentary “Cinema 500 km,” and Haifaa Al-Mansour, director of “Wajdja” and the upcoming “Mary Shelley,” disagreed with Gomez, insisting that the Kingdom should have an international film festival that goes beyond the small Saudi Film Festival run by Ahmed M. Almulla in Dammam since 2008.

“A Saudi international film festival would not not just be a place to screen international films, it would be the only chance for us to screen certain kinds of Saudi films,” said Al-Eyaf. “It could be the only place in the region to see semi-professional films."

Gomez said he believes that international festivals benefit international talent that would come to Dubai or Saudi Arabia more than it does the homegrown talent itself, which Al-Mansour pushed back on.

“Dubai International Film Festival was a hub for all the filmmakers to come and see each other and exchange ideas. ‘Wadjda’ was where I was able to develop this film at the Dubai Film Market, contact producers and all that. It provided a platform for young filmmakers to develop their ideas and their scripts,” said Al-Mansour.

“I’m sure we will have a film festival in Saudi that has this part of it—the development part is focused on providing a place for filmmakers to grow.” 

Al-Mansour said she believes that Saudis would wholeheartedly support the screening of Saudi films either with wide distribution or at a prospective festival, believing that the popularity of homegrown Saudi social media content shows that people are hungry to see more of their own stories told on the big screen.

In an interview with Arab News, Ahmad Al-Maziad, CEO of the General Culture Authority, said yesterday that it intentionally did not begin with a film festival, instead wanting to start with the development of the broader industry. "We're not doing what others have done with an international film festival, we're starting from the bottom. We're doing training, we're doing education, we're working on infrastructure, we're working on talent, production—all the elements of building an actual sustainable industry in Saudi.”


Saudi Red Sea project to offer visa on arrival for tourists

Updated 46 min 48 sec ago
0

Saudi Red Sea project to offer visa on arrival for tourists

  • Saudi Arabia’s Red Sea Project has been registered as a standalone company
  • The venture will be will be headed by John Pagano, former director of London’s Canary Wharf business zone

LONDON: Saudi Arabia’s Red Sea project will offer visas on arrival for overseas visitors following the creation of a company to deliver the ambitious project.
The project marked a milestone on Sunday with its incorporation as a standalone closed joint-stock company, The Red Sea Development Company (TRSDC), wholly owned by the country’s Public Investment Fund (PIF).
The company, which in October announced Virgin Group founder Richard Branson as one of its board members, on Sunday said it had recruited John Pagano, the former managing director of development for the UK’s Canary Wharf Group as its chief executive.
The newly-incorporated company will now move forward with the creation of its Special Economic Zone, with its own regulatory framework, it said in a statement.
The framework will be separate from the base economy, with a special emphasis on environmental sustainability, and will offering visa on entry, relaxed social norms, and improved business regulations.
“The destination will provide a unique sense of place for visitors and offer nature lovers, adventurers, cultural explorers and guests looking to escape and rejuvenate, a wide range of exclusive experiences, combining luxury, tranquillity, adventure and beautiful landscapes,” said Pagano.
The first phase of The Red Sea Project — which will occupy an area greater than the size of Belgium between the cities of Al-Wajh and Umluj — will include hotels and residential units, along with a new costal town, an airport and a marina, and is due for completion by late 2022, the company said.
Authorities hope the project will create as many as 35,000 jobs and contribute SR15 billion ($3.99 billion) to the local economy.
The project, unveiled last July by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, is one of the key developments in Saudi Arabia’s strategy to develop its tourism sector, alongside Qiddiya, an entertainment resort near Riyadh that will be two-and-a-half times the size of Disney World.
The country’s Vision 2030 economic development plan is targeting the creation of 1.2 million new jobs in the Saudi tourism sector by 2030.