Women take over the red carpet at Cannes

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Saudi director Haifa Al Mansour among the 82 women who walked red carpet last night to "protest" on the Red Carpet in Cannes. (AN Photo / Ammar Abd Rabo)
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82 women walk carpet together, by waves of 10, all working in cinema, demanding more rights and equality. (AN Photo / Ammar Abd Rabo)
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82 women walk carpet together, by waves of 10, all working in cinema, demanding more rights and equality. (AN Photo / Ammar Abd Rabo)
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Actress Salma Hayek among the 82 women, seen also in following photos. (AN Photo / Ammar Abd Rabo)
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82 women walk carpet together, by waves of 10, all working in cinema, demanding more rights and equality. (AN Photo / Ammar Abd Rabo)
Updated 13 May 2018
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Women take over the red carpet at Cannes

CANNES, France: Jane Fonda, Salma Hayek and Marion Cotillard were among 82 women who made a symbolic walk up the red carpet at the Cannes Film Festival on Saturday, in a demonstration of solidarity for women struggling for a voice in the movie industry.
At the first Cannes festival since the sexual abuse scandals that broke in Hollywood last year, Cate Blanchett, the head of the jury that will award the Palme d’Or, and veteran French director Agnes Varda read out a statement.
“As women, we all face our own unique challenges, but we stand together on these stairs today as a symbol of our determination and commitment to progress,” read part of the statement.
The number of women taking part is the same as the number of films directed by women to have been selected to feature at Cannes in its more than seven-decade history. In the same period, 1,645 movies directed by men have had that honor.
The Cannes Film Festival runs from May 8 to May 19.


What We Are Reading Today: Say Nothing by Patrick Radden Keefe

Updated 23 February 2019
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What We Are Reading Today: Say Nothing by Patrick Radden Keefe

Patrick Radden Keefe tells the story of the conflict in Northern Ireland between the Irish nationalists, the Catholics, and the unionists, the Protestants, in a time described as The Troubles.

Say Nothing is an excellent account of the Troubles; it might also be a warning, Roddy Doyle stated in a review published in The New York Times

“The book is cleverly structured. We follow people — victim, perpetrator, back to victim — leave them, forget about them, rejoin them decades later. It can be read as a detective story,” the review added. 

Doyle said: “The book is full of the language of my youth, phrases I heard every day — ‘political status,’ ‘shoot-to-kill policy,’ ‘dirty protest,’ ‘legitimate target.’ And it is full of names, names that are more than names — Gerry Adams, Bobby Sands, the Price sisters, Burntollet Bridge, Bloody Sunday, Enniskillen, Margaret Thatcher, Ian Paisley — the names of people and places, events, that carry huge emotional clout, that can still silence a room or start a fight.”

Doyle added: “If it seems as if I’m reviewing a novel, it is because “Say Nothing” has lots of the qualities of good fiction, to the extent that I’m worried I’ll give too much away.”