Emirates hosts $2.7 million race for traditional dhow ships

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Teams sail traditional wooden boats, or dhows, during the Al-Gaffal traditional long-distance dhow sailing race near the island of Sir Bu Nayer on May 14, 2018. Over a hundred traditional dhow racing boats will take part in the race which launches off from Sir Bu Nayer to Abu Dhabi. (AFP/Karim Sahib)
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TOPSHOT — Teams sail traditional wooden boats, or dhows, during the Al-Gaffal traditional long-distance dhow sailing race near the island of Sir Bu Nayer on May 14, 2018. Over a hundred traditional dhow racing boats will take part in the race which launches off from Sir Bu Nayer to Abu Dhabi. / AFP / KARIM SAHIB
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A team sails a traditional wooden boat, or dhow, during the Al-Gaffal traditional long-distance dhow sailing race near the island of Sir Bu Nayer on May 14, 2018. Over a hundred traditional dhow racing boats will take part in the race which launches off from Sir Bu Nayer to Abu Dhabi. (AFP/Karim Sahib)
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Teams sail traditional wooden boats, or dhows, during the Al-Gaffal traditional long-distance dhow sailing race near the island of Sir Bu Nayer on May 14, 2018. Over a hundred traditional dhow racing boats will take part in the race which launches off from Sir Bu Nayer to Abu Dhabi. (AFP/Karim Sahib)
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Teams sail traditional wooden boats, or dhows, during the Al-Gaffal traditional long-distance dhow sailing race near the island of Sir Bu Nayer on May 14, 2018. Over a hundred traditional dhow racing boats will take part in the race which launches off from Sir Bu Nayer to Abu Dhabi. (AFP/Karim Sahib)
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A team sails a traditional wooden boat, or a dhow, called Ghazi owned by Sheikh Hamdan bin Mohammed bin Rashid during the Al-Gaffal traditional long-distance dhow sailing race near the island of Sir Bu Nayer on May 14, 2018. Over a hundred traditional dhow racing boats will take part in the race which launches off from Sir Bu Nayer to Abu Dhabi. (AFP/Karim Sahib)
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Teams sail traditional wooden boats, or dhows, during the Al-Gaffal traditional long-distance dhow sailing race near the island of Sir Bu Nayer on May 14, 2018. Over a hundred traditional dhow racing boats will take part in the race which launches off from Sir Bu Nayer to Abu Dhabi. (AFP/Karim Sahib)
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Teams sail traditional wooden boats, or dhows, during the Al-Gaffal traditional long-distance dhow sailing race near the island of Sir Bu Nayer on May 14, 2018. Over a hundred traditional dhow racing boats will take part in the race which launches off from Sir Bu Nayer to Abu Dhabi. (AFP/Karim Sahib)
Updated 14 May 2018
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Emirates hosts $2.7 million race for traditional dhow ships

  • The Al-Gaffal Traditional Dhow Race happens every year and celebrates the dhow, which is a style of boat still used in the region

SIR BU NAIR ISLAND, United Arab Emirates: The United Arab Emirates has hosted a $2.7 million traditional dhow racing event, which saw the wooden boats powered only on the wind race off the coast of Dubai.
The Al-Gaffal Traditional Dhow Race happens every year and celebrates the dhow, which is a style of boat still used in the region.
The race began Monday on Sir Bu Nair Island, which is about 100 kilometers (66 miles) west of Dubai.
The ships gathered at dawn and the race began. It lasted about five hours and the finish line saw racers arrive near the iconic sailed-shaped Burj Al-Arab hotel.
The winners in this year’s contest was a team on a boat called the Ghazi, owned by Sheikh Hamdan bin Mohammed bin Rashid Al-Maktoum, the crown prince of Dubai.


EgyptAir pulls magazine after Drew Barrymore article

Updated 23 min 21 sec ago
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EgyptAir pulls magazine after Drew Barrymore article

  • EgyptAir will stop printing the issue and will pull out distributed ones from shelves
  • The airline earlier deflected the blame to a partner advertising agency

CAIRO: Egyptian officials say EgyptAir has removed the latest edition of its in-flight magazine over a contentious article it published, purportedly based on an interview with American actress Drew Barrymore.
They say the carrier had agreed with its publisher, Al-Ahram advertising agency, to stop printing more copies of the October issue of the magazine, Horus, and pull the ones already placed onboard the fleet’s aircraft.
The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they weren’t authorized to talk to the media.
Earlier this month, EgyptAir said Al-Ahram is to blame for Horus’ content and specifically for the Barrymore article, which was riddled with misspellings and grammatical errors. It described Barrymore as “being unstable in her relationships” and quoted her as saying that motherhood was “the most important role” of her life.