Bella and Sonia shine at Cannes charity show

Naomi Campbell (C), Bella Hadid (2ndL) and Winnie Harlow (Rear C-R) took part in the show. (AFP)
Updated 14 May 2018
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Bella and Sonia shine at Cannes charity show

  • The annual charity show saw celebrities from across the world join Campbell at the bash, including US-Palestinian model Bella Hadid, Tunisian beauty Sonia Ben Ammar
  • This year, proceeds from the event will go to the Time’s Up movement, as well as Save The Children

DUBAI: British supermodel Naomi Campbell hosted the 13th Fashion for Relief event on the sidelines of this year’s Cannes Film Festival in southern France on Sunday night.

The annual charity show saw celebrities from across the world join Campbell at the bash, including US-Palestinian model Bella Hadid, Tunisian beauty Sonia Ben Ammar, Canadian model Winnie Harlow and French-Algerian actress Farida Khelfa.

This year, proceeds from the event will go to the Time’s Up movement, as well as Save The Children.

“This year’s proceeds will enable Save the Children to provide life-saving food, shelter and medical treatment to children around the world, including those who have been affected by the conflict in Syria,” the charity stated on its events page.

Hadid, Harlow and Campbell took to the catwalk in a colorful array of outfits, including a rainbow-colored dress bedecked in pompoms, which Harlow rocked with aplomb.

The stars weren’t just on the runway, they filled out the crowd too, with the likes of The Weeknd, Michelle Rodriguez, Paris Hilton and Carla Bruni all taking their seats to enjoy the show.

Hadid walked the red carpet prior to the show in a custom Julien Macdonald dress that was covered in sparkling black sequins.

Industry heavyweight Campbell even hinted that it might soon be time to hang up her heels, telling the Daily Mail that she may bow out in the coming years.

 “I don’t know if I can walk much longer, it’s been 32 years,” the 47-year-old told the newspaper.

 “But it’s an honor to walk… I’d love for it to be carried on by the younger generation and for me to sit in the audience and watch.”

It is, perhaps, fitting that part of the proceeds from the show will go to the Time’s Up movement as the 71st Cannes Film Festival has taken on a decidedly female air this year, with a bevy of women-driven films gaining attention, as well as various calls for equality in the film industry being made during the event.

Mexican-American actress Salma Hayek, a vocal campaigner against sexual harassment in the movie industry, said on Sunday male stars should get less pay as way to even things up with chronically underpaid women, Reuters reported.

A day after joining dozens of other female movie makers, including Jane Fonda and Cate Blanchett, at a demonstration at the Cannes Film Festival in support of the struggle for women's rights, Hayek told a conference

"The actors have to say: 'OK, time’s up. I had a good run but now it’s also time to be generous with the actresses in the films.'

"We all have to be part of the adjustment. That’s one idea. I’m going to be hated for it. I hope I can get a job after this!"

The issue of equality has been a running theme throughout the film festival which is the first to take place since sexual harassment allegations against some major Hollywood players surfaced last year

The Cannes Film Festival runs from May 8 to May 19.

Decoder

Time's Up

Time's Up is the Hollywood-driven movement against sexual harassment that was founded on January 1, 2018, by celebrities in response to the Harvey Weinstein scandal


Reminder: Your smartphone is likely tracking your location

Updated 21 August 2018
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Reminder: Your smartphone is likely tracking your location

  • Most apps now use location tracking, and not just for obvious purposes like maps and transport
  • A study by Yale University found that three quarters of Android apps contained trackers — usually containing advertising

PARIS: A new lawsuit accusing Google of tracking people’s locations against their will has served as a reminder that every movement of most smartphone users is being recorded, often without their knowledge.
The California man who filed the suit claims that the tech behemoth continued to track the whereabouts of Android smartphone users even after they turned off “location history.”
But the history of geolocation and the privacy issues it raises are as old as the mobile phone itself.
Before smartphones arrived more than a decade ago, it was still possible to use geolocation. Mobile phones constantly connect to local antenna towers, and by triangulating the signals the user can be found — as Jeff Goldblum illustrated in the 1996 movie “Independence Day.”
However smartphones brought about a far simpler way to track people: GPS.
After the release of the first iPhone revolutionized the industry in 2007, GPS — Global Positioning System using satellites — became prevalent, and it is now included on all smartphones.
Most apps now use location tracking, and not just for obvious purposes like maps and transport. It’s also used for dating, food delivery and gaming, such as Pokemon Go, which became hugely if briefly popular across the world in 2016.
As the popularity of apps using geolocations grows, so does their money-making potential.
For example, when tourists use their phone to explore, they can be targeted with advertising not just from the country they are in but also the city and even the street they are standing on.
A 2014 study by CNIL, the French government’s techonology consumer protection body, showed that between a quarter to a third of apps had access to the phone’s location.
By 2017, a study by Yale University found that three quarters of Android apps contained trackers — usually containing advertising.
The CNIL study also found that some apps tracked the phone’s location more than a million times over a three-month period — accessing the information about once per minute.
The new Google lawsuit is far from the first time privacy concerns have been raised over geolocation. In 2011 fellow tech giant Apple faced a lawsuit over location tracking on its ubiquitous iPhones and iPads.
And there are also national security concerns.
Last month, researchers found that the fitness app Polar had revealed sensitive data on military and intelligence personnel from 69 countries. The app later disabled the function.
Just months before another health app, Strava, was found to have showed potentially sensitive information about US and allied forces around the world.
But the problem includes apps that don’t even need to track the users’ location.
Some simple flashlight apps have been discovered to have been secretly sharing location information.