Bella and Sonia shine at Cannes charity show

Naomi Campbell (C), Bella Hadid (2ndL) and Winnie Harlow (Rear C-R) took part in the show. (AFP)
Updated 14 May 2018
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Bella and Sonia shine at Cannes charity show

  • The annual charity show saw celebrities from across the world join Campbell at the bash, including US-Palestinian model Bella Hadid, Tunisian beauty Sonia Ben Ammar
  • This year, proceeds from the event will go to the Time’s Up movement, as well as Save The Children

DUBAI: British supermodel Naomi Campbell hosted the 13th Fashion for Relief event on the sidelines of this year’s Cannes Film Festival in southern France on Sunday night.

The annual charity show saw celebrities from across the world join Campbell at the bash, including US-Palestinian model Bella Hadid, Tunisian beauty Sonia Ben Ammar, Canadian model Winnie Harlow and French-Algerian actress Farida Khelfa.

This year, proceeds from the event will go to the Time’s Up movement, as well as Save The Children.

“This year’s proceeds will enable Save the Children to provide life-saving food, shelter and medical treatment to children around the world, including those who have been affected by the conflict in Syria,” the charity stated on its events page.

Hadid, Harlow and Campbell took to the catwalk in a colorful array of outfits, including a rainbow-colored dress bedecked in pompoms, which Harlow rocked with aplomb.

The stars weren’t just on the runway, they filled out the crowd too, with the likes of The Weeknd, Michelle Rodriguez, Paris Hilton and Carla Bruni all taking their seats to enjoy the show.

Hadid walked the red carpet prior to the show in a custom Julien Macdonald dress that was covered in sparkling black sequins.

Industry heavyweight Campbell even hinted that it might soon be time to hang up her heels, telling the Daily Mail that she may bow out in the coming years.

 “I don’t know if I can walk much longer, it’s been 32 years,” the 47-year-old told the newspaper.

 “But it’s an honor to walk… I’d love for it to be carried on by the younger generation and for me to sit in the audience and watch.”

It is, perhaps, fitting that part of the proceeds from the show will go to the Time’s Up movement as the 71st Cannes Film Festival has taken on a decidedly female air this year, with a bevy of women-driven films gaining attention, as well as various calls for equality in the film industry being made during the event.

Mexican-American actress Salma Hayek, a vocal campaigner against sexual harassment in the movie industry, said on Sunday male stars should get less pay as way to even things up with chronically underpaid women, Reuters reported.

A day after joining dozens of other female movie makers, including Jane Fonda and Cate Blanchett, at a demonstration at the Cannes Film Festival in support of the struggle for women's rights, Hayek told a conference

"The actors have to say: 'OK, time’s up. I had a good run but now it’s also time to be generous with the actresses in the films.'

"We all have to be part of the adjustment. That’s one idea. I’m going to be hated for it. I hope I can get a job after this!"

The issue of equality has been a running theme throughout the film festival which is the first to take place since sexual harassment allegations against some major Hollywood players surfaced last year

The Cannes Film Festival runs from May 8 to May 19.

Decoder

Time's Up

Time's Up is the Hollywood-driven movement against sexual harassment that was founded on January 1, 2018, by celebrities in response to the Harvey Weinstein scandal


Saudi film industry heralds new dawn with opening of first arthouse cinema

Updated 26 June 2019
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Saudi film industry heralds new dawn with opening of first arthouse cinema

  • Cinema El-Housh is the brainchild of Saudi film director, producer and screenwriter Mahmoud Sabbagh and the event will continue until July 25 as part of the Jeddah Season festival
  • Mahmoud Sabbagh: We chose old Jeddah because the phenomena existed here, and the idea of an arthouse film isn’t new

JEDDAH: Saudi Arabia’s blossoming film industry on Tuesday heralded a new dawn with the launch of the Kingdom’s first arthouse cinema.

The outdoor Cinema El-Housh opened in the historic city of Jeddah with the screening of director Stanley Kubrick’s celebrated “2001: A Space Odyssey” to mark the movie’s 51st anniversary.

The project is the brainchild of Saudi film director, producer and screenwriter Mahmoud Sabbagh and the event will continue until July 25 as part of the Jeddah Season festival.

“Cinema El-Housh is one of the first proper arthouses for film theater initiatives in Saudi Arabia and in Jeddah,” Sabbagh told Arab News.

“The idea of the cinema comes from outdoor cinemas, which was a phenomenon that existed in old Jeddah from the 1940s until the end of the 1970s, where people gathered in courtyards where they would screen a film and enjoy it.

“We are bringing that back to the community with all its minimalism and gestures for bringing people together and bringing the communal experience of watching films again,” he said.

“We chose old Jeddah because the phenomena existed here, and the idea of an arthouse film isn’t new. It really strikes a balance between a commercial cinema and non-commercial cinemas.

“With the opening of cinemas, we are witnessing a burst of commercial-driven cinema multiplexes. However, there was a void someone had to fill by introducing this idea of arthouse cinemas,” added Sabbagh.

“We are free to screen films that are of non-commercial value, non-mainstream, more independent films that are film festival frequent and classics, and Saudi films. We want to be a platform for all the emerging Saudi voices.”

 

Tuesday’s private screening of “2001: A Space Odyssey” was also attended by Saudi actor Khaled Yeslam who said the film’s message conveyed the dawning of a new era in the Kingdom.

“From my perspective, choosing “2001: A Space Odyssey,” it started with the new dawn of mankind. And the music played was the music we listened to in the 1980s and 1990s,” Yeslam told Arab News.

“So, seeing such an entry as a film in Al-Balad, it’s a metaphor itself; here in Al-Balad, in Jeddah, in Saudi Arabia itself. I thought it was planned and that he meant to do that. And I think Mahmoud is such a genius for choosing such a film.”

On the Kingdom’s booming film industry, Yeslam said: “Through movies, it’s finally our (Saudis) time to tell our stories. We’re fed up with the stereotypes and double standards by Western media and it’s time to reveal our reality.

“In the end, we’re just human, we’re just like everyone else, and I believe that art is a way to connect with others as humans.”

FACTOID

Outdoor cinemas existed in Jeddah from the 1940s until the late 1970s.