What We Are Reading Today: We Should All Be Feminists by Chimamanda Ggozi Adichie

Updated 16 May 2018
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What We Are Reading Today: We Should All Be Feminists by Chimamanda Ggozi Adichie

  • The Nigerian novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, who splits her time between the United States and Nigeria, muses in her humorous yet insightful way about what it is to be a feminist these days

This essay, adapted from the author’s popular TEDx talk of the same name, comes in a little book not much bigger than a pamphlet, the perfect format for the modern woman’s manifesto it has become. 

In fact, Maria Grazia Chiuri used its title as a slogan on a T-shirt in her first runway show for Dior, which might have been more of a hit than the talk itself. So now you can read what all the fuss is about. 

The Nigerian novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, who splits her time between the United States and Nigeria, muses in her humorous yet insightful way about what it is to be a feminist these days. 

Her vision is inclusive: All of us, as men and women, must do better, particularly when it comes to raising our children. “I would like to ask that we begin to dream about and plan for a different world. A fairer world. A world of happier men and happier women who are truer to themselves.” And we should all agree with that.


What We Are Watching Today: The Revolution Will Not Be Televised 

Updated 21 May 2018
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What We Are Watching Today: The Revolution Will Not Be Televised 

In Venezuela, where elections took place on Sunday, the legacy of the late firebrand socialist leader Hugo Chavez still dominates the country.

President Nicolas Maduro was the hand-picked successor to Chavez and campaigns on a platform of continuing the “Chavismo” policies.

Those policies have plunged the country into a deep economic crisis, despite it having some of the world’s largest oil reserves.

“The Revolution Will Not Be Televised” is a 2003 documentary, which was filmed by an Irish crew, in the buildup to and during an attempted coup against Chavez in 2002.

It focuses on the role of the private media and the coverage of violent protests.

While it has been accused of pro-Chavez bias, the filmmakers’ close proximity to the unfolding events gives an uncomfortable view of the political schisms that threaten to tear Venezuela apart.