Saudi Arabia suspend World Cup referee over bribery

A file photo of Saudi referee Fahad Al-Mirdasi (Karim Jaafar/AFP)
Updated 16 May 2018
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Saudi Arabia suspend World Cup referee over bribery

  • Mirdasi was suspended for offering to take a bribe to influence the outcome of a match, the federation’s disciplinary and ethics committee said
  • He is one of Saudi Arabia’s most prominent referees, having earned a FIFA badge in 2011 and officiating at the Rio de Janeiro Olympics in 2016 and the Confederations Cup in Russia in 2017

RIYADH: The Saudi Arabian Football Federation have banned referee Fahad Al-Mirdasi for life over bribery and urged FIFA to remove him from the pool of referees for the 2018 World Cup in Russia.
Mirdasi was suspended for offering to take a bribe to influence the outcome of a match, the federation’s disciplinary and ethics committee said late Tuesday.
The 32-year-old is one of Saudi Arabia’s most prominent referees, having earned a FIFA badge in 2011 and officiating at the Rio de Janeiro Olympics in 2016 and the Confederations Cup in Russia in 2017.
Mirdasi was chosen to referee Saudi Arabia’s Kings Cup final between top clubs Al-Faisaly and Al-Ittihad on Saturday but was pulled from the roster just a few hours before the game.
In a statement, the disciplinary and ethics committee said Mirdasi had approached the president of Al-Ittihad asking him for a bribe to enable his team to win.
“The Ittihad president Hamad Al-Sanayeh called the Saudi Football Federation to state there was evidence that Fahad Al-Mirdasi had reached out via text messages on WhatsApp. He asked for an illegal sum of money in exchange for helping his team win the game,” it said.
The case was referred to the Saudi Football Federation, then the General Authority for Sport — the highest sports authority in the kingdom — triggering an administrative investigation.
Mirdasi confessed to the charges, according to the statement, and it was decided “to deprive him from participating in any football activity for life.”
The committee recommended that Saudi Arabia officially request FIFA to remove Mirdasi from the list of referees participating in the 2018 World Cup and suspend him for life.
Mirdasi was one of five Arab referees chosen by FIFA to officiate at the 2018 World Cup.

Fifa has requested more information.

"Fifa notes the information that referee Fahad Al Mirdasi has allegedly been banned from all football-related activities by the Saudi Arabian Football Federation (SAFF)," the world governing body told BBC Sport.


Enable eyes more history as fantastic filly bids for Breeders' Cup glory

Updated 16 October 2018
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Enable eyes more history as fantastic filly bids for Breeders' Cup glory

  • No horse has ever won the Arc and Breeders' Cup in the same season.
  • The last Arc winner to win again in the same season was All Along, way back in 1983.

LONDON: Two-time Prix de l'Arc de Triomphe winner Enable will bid for yet more history after it was announced she is to run in the Breeders' Cup Turf next month.

Two weeks ago the Saudi Arabian-owned filly became only the seventh double winner of the Arc. Straight after the famous race at Longchamps in Paris it was mooted that Enable, owned by Prince Khalid Abdullah, would aim to become the first home to win a hat-trick of Arcs. 

But while that still may happen Teddy Grimthrorpe, racing manager for Khalid Abdullah, revealed the filly will first try to become the first winner of both the Arc and Breeders' Cup in the same season. 

In a statement Grimthorpe said: “Prince Khalid has given the go ahead for Enable to run in the Breeders’ Cup Turf, Group One. No decisions on her future will be made until after the race.

“(Enable) is an extraordinary athlete.”

The last Arc winner to win again in the same season was All Along, way back in 1983. Trained by Patrick Biancone and ridden by Walter Swinburn, she won the Canadian International a couple of weeks' later.

The John Gosden-trained horse won her second Arc under Frankie Dettori earlier this month. And Gosden admitted there had been some debate as to whether the the four-year-old would defend her Paris crown. 

“I was pretty anxious going into it as we lost a week. Losing a filly for five days that should be cantering and working knocks you back and we went back to where we were before the Kempton race.

“You lose the benefit of having a run and she missed her main work. It was a bit nip and tuck.”