Australia leads in halal meat production

Animals are treated properly and they have easy access to food and water in Australia.
Updated 16 May 2018
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Australia leads in halal meat production

With a Muslim population of about half a million, Australia has become a world leader in the processing and production of halal meat and meat products. The continent is a long-time, trusted supplier of halal beef and lamb to more than  100 countries including the Middle East.

Australia has one of the strictest halal programs in the world. The Australian Government Authorized Halal Program (AGAHP) is undertaken in collaboration with the government’s department of agriculture and water resources, and Australian Islamic organizations. 

The country has invested millions of dollars in research and development of  meat science and understands that healthy, well-fed and stress-free livestock produce the best quality meat for all consumers to enjoy.

One of the important halal requirements is that animals are treated properly their entire lives and that they have easy access to food and water and are free to roam. Australia, with its natural environment and the world’s highest animal-welfare standards, easily meets these requirements.

Additionally, all processing facilities in Australia employ only registered and trained Muslim slaughtermen. 

Master Chef Tarek Ibrahim, the first master chef from the Middle East, said: “You can confidently enjoy your food knowing that when you buy Australian halal beef and lamb, you are getting clean, safe and 100 percent guaranteed halal meat.”

The halal marketplace is emerging as one of the fastest-growing segments in the world food business. The global halal food market is worth an estimated $667 million, representing close to 20 percent of the entire global food industry. It is expected to reach $2.55 trillion by 2024. 

The Middle East imports about 90 percent of the beef and lamb it consumes. The total imports of red meat products are estimated at $5.1 billion. In tandem with the expected rise in the region’s population by 40 percent by 2030, the consumption of food in the Middle East may well reach 51 million tons by 2020 representing an annual average growth of 4.6 percent. 

The GCC’s halal sector is worth $50 billion. The region’s annual food imports are expected to double from $25.8 billion in 2010 to $53 billion in 2020, with total imports of halal meat exceeding 1 million metric tons on an annual basis.

According to economists, the halal food industry will become a major market force in the near future based on prevalent trends. 


ALJ to drive foreign investment in auto sector

Updated 16 August 2018
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ALJ to drive foreign investment in auto sector

Abdul Latif Jameel (ALJ) and Japanese company Kosei Aluminium (Kosei) have signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) with the National Industrial Clusters Development Program (NICDP), driving foreign investment into Saudi Arabia’s auto manufacturing sector.

The MoU seeks to explore the manufacturing of automotive aluminum wheels and components in Saudi Arabia and is the first major Saudi Arabian-based automotive components manufacturing venture intended to produce export products for worldwide markets.

Long-term plans for the venture involve the establishment of a factory in Saudi Arabia, as a global hub for Kosei, contributed by Saudi Arabian Mining Company (MA’ADEN). The volume of wheels produced is expected to represent a significant market share in the world.

The MoU, signed by NICDP Vice President Abdullah Al-Hazani, on behalf of NICDP President Homood Al-Tuwaijiri, Kosei CEO and President Shunkichi Kamiya, and Abdul Latif Jameel Vice Chairman and Deputy President Hassan Jameel will see Abdul Latif Jameel, Kosei and NICDP undertake a study into the technical and financial feasibility of manufacturing automotive aluminum die casting wheels and components in Saudi Arabia. This would contribute to the development of the manufacturing industry in the country — a key priority of Saudi Vision 2030.

Kamiya said: “It is our pleasure to sign this MoU with NICDP and Abdul Latif Jameel, to discover the enormous potential and various opportunities in the Kingdom as well as the MENA region. I am pleased to state that, the timing of Kosei’s global vision 2021 and Saudi Arabia’s Vision 2030 are so apt that, it has brought the three parties together to conduct the feasibility study and work toward achieving the goals.”

Al-Hazani said: “We are glad to have this MoU signed with Kosei Aluminum, one of the prominent global automotive suppliers in Japan, and Abdul Latif Jameel, one of the biggest automotive business expertise established in Saudi Arabia.”

 Signing this MoU is a part of NICDP’s plans and activities to develop a globally competitive automotive industry, together with growing a strong automotive parts supply base, in Saudi Arabia, which is in line with Vision 2030 to diversify economy in non-oil sector in the kingdom.”

Jameel said: “This MoU explores the exciting potential to bring manufacturing skills and jobs to Saudi Arabia and marks the first Saudi Arabian venture in large-scale automotive components manufacturing for export. The agreement is an important step in NICDP’s efforts to develop the manufacturing industry in Saudi Arabia in accordance with Saudi Vision 2030, and strives to make a valuable contribution to the Saudi automotive cluster.” 

The signing comes ahead of the expected visit to Saudi Arabia by Japanese Prime Minister, Shinzō Abe, and follows a visit by King Salman in March 2017, during which Saudi Arabia and Japan agreed to deepen existing bilateral relations between the two countries and establish a solid strategic partnership, as part of the Saudi-Japan Vision 2030.