What We Are Reading Today: The New Journalism, by Tom Wolfe

Updated 17 May 2018
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What We Are Reading Today: The New Journalism, by Tom Wolfe

  • Examining everything from the mind-bending effects of LSD to the optimism of the civil rights movement and the horrors of the Vietnam war, the book provides a unique snapshot of the period. 

On Monday, Tom Wolfe, the American novelist and journalist, died at the age of 88. 

Known for his flamboyant writing style and trademark white suits, Wolfe was one of the last survivors of a pioneering generation of reporters who transformed the landscape of US journalism in the 1960s and 1970s. 

Their work fused the literary techniques of fiction with the more traditional aspects of hard-edged reporting to provide vivid portraits of an era that promised to change the world. 

‘The New Journalism’, an anthology edited by Wolfe, features some of the finest examples of their writing. 

Examining everything from the mind-bending effects of LSD to the optimism of the civil rights movement and the horrors of the Vietnam war, the book provides a unique snapshot of the period. 

Writers included in ‘The New Journalism’ include Truman Capote, Hunter S. Thompson, Norman Mailer, Gay Talese and Joan Didion, as well as Wolfe himself. 

Although their work is often mimicked today, very few contemporary reporters posses the talent and panache of this golden generation.


The Six: Celebrate the Man Booker announcement with these regional reads

Books from the Middle East to read. (Shutterstock)
Updated 12 min 51 sec ago
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The Six: Celebrate the Man Booker announcement with these regional reads

DUBAI: With the 2018 Man Booker prize being announced on Tuesday, we take a look at six books from the Middle East that deserve to be read before the year is over.

‘Where the Bird Disappeared’
Taking inspiration from the stories of Prophet Zakariyya and his son Yahya, Palestinian poet and writer Ghassan Zaqtan’s book is a beautiful novel set in the village of Zakariyya, in modern-day Palestine.

‘Ascension to Death’
Syrian novelist Mamdouh Azzam tells the story of a young girl’s fate in a southern Syrian village.

‘Tippu Tip’
Stuart Laing writes a biography that transports the reader into an extraordinary world with an exotic cast of characters.

‘Elsewhere, Home’
Written by Leila Aboulela, the book is an enchanting collection of short stories that stretch from Khartoum to Scotland.

‘The Merchant of Syria’
Diana Darke interweaves the story of a cloth merchant with the development of Syria in an insightful look at the life of a businessman who expands his trade.

‘The Baghdad Clock’
Shahad Al-Rawi’s extraordinary novel turns life in embattled Iraq into a fantastical world of characters and memories by following two young girls who meet during Operation Desert Storm in 1991.