What We Are Reading Today: The New Journalism, by Tom Wolfe

Updated 17 May 2018
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What We Are Reading Today: The New Journalism, by Tom Wolfe

  • Examining everything from the mind-bending effects of LSD to the optimism of the civil rights movement and the horrors of the Vietnam war, the book provides a unique snapshot of the period. 

On Monday, Tom Wolfe, the American novelist and journalist, died at the age of 88. 

Known for his flamboyant writing style and trademark white suits, Wolfe was one of the last survivors of a pioneering generation of reporters who transformed the landscape of US journalism in the 1960s and 1970s. 

Their work fused the literary techniques of fiction with the more traditional aspects of hard-edged reporting to provide vivid portraits of an era that promised to change the world. 

‘The New Journalism’, an anthology edited by Wolfe, features some of the finest examples of their writing. 

Examining everything from the mind-bending effects of LSD to the optimism of the civil rights movement and the horrors of the Vietnam war, the book provides a unique snapshot of the period. 

Writers included in ‘The New Journalism’ include Truman Capote, Hunter S. Thompson, Norman Mailer, Gay Talese and Joan Didion, as well as Wolfe himself. 

Although their work is often mimicked today, very few contemporary reporters posses the talent and panache of this golden generation.


What We Are Reading Today: MH370: Mystery Solved by Larry Vance

Updated 24 May 2018
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What We Are Reading Today: MH370: Mystery Solved by Larry Vance

  • Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 went missing in 2014
  • Australian Transport Safety Bureau believes the airliner most likely ran out of fuel

The disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 in March 2014 is one of the world’s biggest aviation mysteries. Malaysia said on Wednesday that the search for the aircraft would end next week, after more than four years. Fragments of the Boeing 777, which was on its way from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing, were found washed up on islands off the African coast. 

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau believes the airliner most likely ran out of fuel and crashed after flying far off course. 

It believes all 239 passengers and crew on board were long dead inside a depressurized cabin and cockpit. “MH370: Mystery Solved,” written by Canadian air crash investigator Larry Vance, concludes that the pilot deliberately crashed the plane in an area where it would sink into unexplored depths of the Indian Ocean. Peter Foley, who coordinated the search for Malaysia, on Tuesday dismissed the book’s claim.