What We Are Reading Today: The New Journalism, by Tom Wolfe

Updated 17 May 2018
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What We Are Reading Today: The New Journalism, by Tom Wolfe

  • Examining everything from the mind-bending effects of LSD to the optimism of the civil rights movement and the horrors of the Vietnam war, the book provides a unique snapshot of the period. 

On Monday, Tom Wolfe, the American novelist and journalist, died at the age of 88. 

Known for his flamboyant writing style and trademark white suits, Wolfe was one of the last survivors of a pioneering generation of reporters who transformed the landscape of US journalism in the 1960s and 1970s. 

Their work fused the literary techniques of fiction with the more traditional aspects of hard-edged reporting to provide vivid portraits of an era that promised to change the world. 

‘The New Journalism’, an anthology edited by Wolfe, features some of the finest examples of their writing. 

Examining everything from the mind-bending effects of LSD to the optimism of the civil rights movement and the horrors of the Vietnam war, the book provides a unique snapshot of the period. 

Writers included in ‘The New Journalism’ include Truman Capote, Hunter S. Thompson, Norman Mailer, Gay Talese and Joan Didion, as well as Wolfe himself. 

Although their work is often mimicked today, very few contemporary reporters posses the talent and panache of this golden generation.


What We Are Watching Today: The Revolution Will Not Be Televised 

Updated 21 May 2018
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What We Are Watching Today: The Revolution Will Not Be Televised 

In Venezuela, where elections took place on Sunday, the legacy of the late firebrand socialist leader Hugo Chavez still dominates the country.

President Nicolas Maduro was the hand-picked successor to Chavez and campaigns on a platform of continuing the “Chavismo” policies.

Those policies have plunged the country into a deep economic crisis, despite it having some of the world’s largest oil reserves.

“The Revolution Will Not Be Televised” is a 2003 documentary, which was filmed by an Irish crew, in the buildup to and during an attempted coup against Chavez in 2002.

It focuses on the role of the private media and the coverage of violent protests.

While it has been accused of pro-Chavez bias, the filmmakers’ close proximity to the unfolding events gives an uncomfortable view of the political schisms that threaten to tear Venezuela apart.