Any doctor on board? US surgeon general gives aid on plane

Dr. Jerome Adams, the US surgeon general. (AP)
Updated 17 May 2018
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Any doctor on board? US surgeon general gives aid on plane

  • Adams was on a Delta Airlines flight from Fort Lauderdale to Atlanta when a call went out for a doctor on board for an emergency.

JACKSON, Mississippi: When the call went out for a doctor on board, the US surgeon general says he gladly stepped in to help with a medical emergency on a commercial flight.
Dr. Jerome Adams, an anesthesiologist, said he assisted someone on a Delta Air Lines jet as he prepared to fly Wednesday to Jackson, Mississippi.
Adams tweeted that a call went out requesting a doctor.
A person lost consciousness when the plane was on the ground in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, and Adams and two nurses responded, said Kate Migliaccio-Grabill, a Department of Health and Human Services spokeswoman.
The patient woke up, and Adams determined it was best for the plane to return to the gate and for the patient to go to a hospital for further evaluation. Adams also called the patient’s spouse to explain what happened, the spokeswoman said.
Adams tweeted that the patient was doing well and, like a good public health service doctor, he was happy to assist.
Adams was on a flight from Fort Lauderdale to Atlanta to catch a connecting flight to Mississippi’s capital city, where he has public events Thursday, including a panel discussion on opioid abuse.
Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant tweeted back at the surgeon general: “Nice job, Dr. Adams!“


Chip Wickham ushers in winds of change on the jazz scene

Updated 22 May 2018
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Chip Wickham ushers in winds of change on the jazz scene

PARIS: The hotly hyped “British jazz invasion” has been the toast of international scenesters for some months now, with breathy adjective-heavy sprawls penned on both sides of the Atlantic paying tribute to a fresh generation of musos who grew up not in the conservatoires but the clubs, channelling the grit and groove of grime into a distinctly hip, 21st century strain of freewheeling, DIY improvised music.

Now the Arab world has its own outpost in the form of Chip Wickham, a UK-born flautist, saxophonist and producer whose second album grew out of extended stints teaching in the GCC. “Shamal Wind” takes its name from the Gulf’s primal weather patterns, and there’s a distinctly meditative, Middle Eastern vibe to the title track, a slow-burning, moody vamp, peppered with percussive trills, with hints of Yusef Lateef to be found in Wickham’s wandering woodwind musings.

There’s rather less goatee-stroking to be found across the four further up-tempo cuts, which swap soul-searching for soul-jazz, soaked in the breezy bop of a vintage Blue Note release. Recorded over a hot summer in Madrid, a heady Latin pulse drives first single, “Barrio 71” — championed by the likes of Craig Charles — with Spanish multi-percussionist David el Indio steaming up a block party beat framing Wickham’s gutsy workout on baritone sax.

Having previously worked with electronic acts, including Nightmares on Wax and Jimpster, one imagines the dancefloor was a key stimulus behind Wickham’s rhythmically dense, but harmonically spare compositional approach. Phil Wilkinson’s sheer, thumped piano chords drive the relentless nod of second single “Snake Eyes,” Wickham’s raspy flute floating somewhere overhead, readymade to be skimmed off for the anticipated remix market.

In truth, Manchester-raised Wickham is both too thoughtful, and too thoughtless, to truly belong to the London-brewed jazz invasion — Shamal Wind yo-yos between meditative meandering and soulful strutting with a wilful disrespect for trend.