All Things Mochi boasts homespun Ramadan collection

The Dubai-based brand has long been a champion of ethical threads, incorporating artisanal embroidery techniques from across the globe into perennially boho-chic blouses and billowy dresses. (Amy Sturgis)
Updated 17 May 2018
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All Things Mochi boasts homespun Ramadan collection

  • The Dubai-based brand has long been a champion of ethical threads, incorporating artisanal embroidery techniques from across the globe into perennially boho-chic blouses and billowy dresses
  •  This year’s Ramadan collection is no exception, but a local spin makes it particularly appropriate for the Holy Month

LONDON: While a range of designers and retailers have rolled out special capsule collections this year, All Things Mochi may take the cake for its full embrace of the Ramadan spirit.  

The Dubai-based brand has long been a champion of ethical threads, incorporating artisanal embroidery techniques from across the globe into perennially boho-chic blouses and billowy dresses. This year’s Ramadan collection is no exception, but a local spin makes it particularly appropriate for the Holy Month — launched in collaboration with the Irthi Contemporary Crafts Council, the line features “Talli” braiding, a traditional brocading technique that has been used to adorn Emirati dresses for centuries.  While Emirati craftswomen have passed on this ancient weaving knowledge through the generations, the Mochi Ramadan collection will fit comfortably in modern wardrobes: Billowy kaftans and ankle-skimming dresses are patterned with printed and embroidered hands. Inspired by henna, another embellishment with a long local history, the line embodies a casual, bohemian vibe. Patterned with the collection’s token henna hands, the Maliha dress — with a slight crew neck and three-quarter-length sleeves — would be equally perfect for a stroll in Los Angeles or an iftar gathering in Jeddah. If blushed and earthy ochre tones dominate the line, bold-hued bracelets, chokers and earrings are the perfect complements to an otherwise subtle and chic Ramadan collection.

The entire look book is at once modern and modest—a full embrace of Emirati femininity and history with easy, loose silhouettes.

 “‘I am really happy with how this collection developed, it really represents everything my brand stands for (and) makes clear reference to the culture I am surrounded by day in day out,” said All Things Mochi founder Ayah Tabari. “It strongly recognizes the talent that is amongst us in the region and the communities which are helping to sustain their craft.”

But the line is far more than an historical homage: Each design was handwoven by one of 36 female artisans at the Bidwa Development Program Center in Sharjah in an initiative by the Irthi Contemporary Crafts Council, which helps connect local craftswomen with global designers eager to incorporate their unique intricate embellishments in their designs. 

With nimble, hennaed fingers, women at the Sharjah-based center transform spools of thread into Mochi’s luxe frocks.    

“The council’s Bidwa Social Development Program, in Dibba Al-Hisn in Sharjah, enables craftswomen to generate a sustainable source of income and achieve professional and social empowerment through their craft,” explains Reem Bin Karam, director of NAMA Women Advancement Establishment in a released statement.

Mochi has championed the skills of local craftswomen across the globe and  Tabari has previously worked with female artisans from Morocco to Uzbekistan.  Originally from Palestine, Tabari insists upon creating designs that are both culturally authentic and befitting of the jet-set fashionistas she counts among her clientele. Her approach has generated a cult following — everyone from Georgia Jagger to Queen Rania of Jordan have donned the duds. Earlier this year, Tabari presented a Mexico-inspired collection at New York Fashion Week. 

But the local roots and story behind the 2018 Ramadan collection make it particularly appropriate for the season. Bridging the gap between glossy modern malls and home-spun Emirati heritage, the line is a festive celebration of both the old and the new.


Delhi braces for pollution with emergency plan

Updated 3 min 39 sec ago
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Delhi braces for pollution with emergency plan

  • Under the new strategy, restrictions on construction sites and traffic will be imposed depending on the air quality

NEW DELHI, India: Delhi’s biggest coal power plant was set to shut down Monday as a new emergency plan to improve air quality in one of the world’s most polluted cities came into force, Indian officials said.
Under the new strategy, restrictions on construction sites and traffic will be imposed depending on the air quality in the megacity of some 20 million people.
When the air is classed as “poor,” as it was on Monday, authorities will ban the burning of garbage in landfills as well as fire crackers and certain construction activities.
When the air is “very poor” diesel generators will be halted, parking fees hiked and more public transport provided. “Severe” measures include closing brick kilns.
When it reaches “severe+,” a new category, authorities will stop the entry of trucks except those with essential goods and regulate the number of cars on the road.
The Badarpur thermal plant was due to permanently close on Monday because of its high contribution to pollution in the city.
Smog spikes during winter in Delhi, when air quality often eclipses the World Health Organization’s safe levels.
Cooler air traps pollutants — such as from vehicles, building sites and farmers burning crops in regions outside the Indian capital — close to the ground.
Authorities in the sprawling city attempted to implement similar measures last winter but to little avail.
This is partly because authorities are powerless to prevent some sources of pollution.
“Our aim is to stop the air quality from deteriorating further though certain factors are out of our control such as crop burning, wind speed and lack of public transportation,” environment authority official Bhure Lal said.