Dubai satellite captures image of Ramadan crescent 2018

An image of the Ramadan crescent captured by DubaiSat-2. (Mohammed bin Rashid Space Centre)
Updated 17 May 2018
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Dubai satellite captures image of Ramadan crescent 2018

LONDON: An image of the Ramadan crescent was captured by the Mohammed bin Rashid Space Center’s (MBRSC) remote sensing satellite DubaiSat-2 this week.

The image, released by MBRSC, was taken by rotating the earth observation satellite, a maneuver that took weeks of planning and hours of painstaking alignment.

Taken with a roll tilt angle of 0 degrees and roll pitch angle of 79.63 degrees, the final image was post-processed to highlight the crescent aspect of the moon.

DubaiSat-2 orbits Earth at a speed of 7.5 kilometers/ second, completing each total orbit of the planet in 90 minutes. Its camera images Earth from an altitude of some 600 kilometers at a resolution of 1 meter per pixel, providing world class images

The start of Ramadan is determined by the lunar calendar which follows a 29- or 30-day cycle determined by the cycle of the moon. Muslims anticipate the end of Shaaban, the month preceding Ramadan, by watching for the absence or presence of the crescent moon, which respectively indicates the continuation of Shaban or the beginning of Ramadan. 

Sighting of the Ramadan crescent can be achieved by three methods: through telescopes and binoculars; using astronomy; or viewing with the naked eye.


Anti-money-laundering body gives Iran until February to complete reforms

Updated 25 min ago
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Anti-money-laundering body gives Iran until February to complete reforms

  • The Financial Action Task Force said it was disappointed that Tehran had acted on only nine out of 10 of its guidelines despite pledges to make the grade

PARIS: The international group that monitors money laundering worldwide said on Friday Iran had until February to complete reforms that would bring it into line with global norms or face consequences.
The Paris-based Financial Action Task Force said after a meeting of its members that it was disappointed that Tehran had acted on only nine out of 10 of its guidelines despite pledges to make the grade.
“We expect Iran to move swiftly to implement the commitments that it undertook at a high level so long ago,” said Marshall Billingslea, the US assistant Treasury Secretary for terrorist financing, after chairing an FATF meeting.
“In line with that, we expect that it will have adopted all of these measures by February. If by February 2019 Iran has not yet done so, then we will take further steps,” he said.
In the meantime, the FATF said it had decided to continue suspending counter-measures, which can go as far as limiting or even banning transactions with a country.
Iran’s parliament approved some new measures against funding terrorism earlier this month under pressure to adopt international standards. But FATF said that it could only consider fully enacted legislation.
Members of FATF had already given Tehran until this month to bring its laws against money-laundering and funding of terrorism up to its guidelines.
Otherwise, Iran risked being returned to a blacklist of non-compliant countries that makes foreign investors and banks reluctant to deal with it.
Britain, France and Germany are trying to keep some financial channels open to Iran after the US pulled out of a 2015 nuclear deal in May and re-imposed sanctions.
Analysts say that inclusion on the FATF’s blacklist could effectively make that all but impossible.