Meghan’s wedding dress: Britain’s best-kept secret

Britain's Prince Harry and his fiancee Meghan Markle arrive to attend the traditional Christmas Day service, at St. Mary Magdalene Church in Sandringham, England, in this file photo. (AP)
Updated 17 May 2018
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Meghan’s wedding dress: Britain’s best-kept secret

LONDON: Will it be white? Satin or lace? British or foreign made? The tightly-guarded secret of Meghan Markle’s wedding dress will finally be revealed when she walks down the aisle to marry Prince Harry on Saturday.
Anticipation has reached levels not seen since the 2011 wedding of Harry’s brother Prince William and Catherine Middleton, who in the end wore a white and ivory satin gown designed by Sarah Burton from the Alexander McQueen fashion house, a 100 percent British creation.
US actress Meghan may also opt for a dress from her adopted country to curry favor with the public and to boost Britain’s valuable fashion industry.
There is also some speculation, although far less, about what ex-army man Harry will wear on his big day — a civilian suit or a full dress uniform?
London has been buzzing for weeks with rumors about who will design Markle’s dress, with Burberry, Ralph & Russo, who had made Markle’s engagement dress, Stella McCartney, Erdem, Alexander McQueen, Antonio Berardi and Roland Mouret all being mentioned.
Mouret told AFP in February that he wouldn’t reveal if he was the chosen man, saying: “She’s a friend and the great gift I can give my friends is to keep their lives private.”
Fashionista Markle told Glamour magazine in 2016 that her ideal outfit would be “very pared down and relaxed.”
“I personally prefer wedding dresses that are whimsical or subtly romantic,” she said.


What We Are Reading Today: The Proof and the Pudding by Jim Henle

Updated 21 October 2018
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What We Are Reading Today: The Proof and the Pudding by Jim Henle

  • Pleasurable and lighthearted, The Proof and the Pudding is a feast for the intellect as well as the palate

Tie on your apron and step into Jim Henle’s kitchen as he demonstrates how two equally savory pursuits — cooking and mathematics — have more in common than you realize. A tasty dish for gourmets of popular math, The Proof and the Pudding offers a witty and flavorful blend of mathematical treats and gastronomic delights that reveal how life in the mathematical world is tantalizingly similar to life in the kitchen.

Take a tricky Sudoku puzzle and a cake that fell. Henle shows you that the best way to deal with cooking disasters is also the best way to solve math problems. Or take an L-shaped billiard table and a sudden desire for Italian potstickers. He explains how preferring geometry over algebra (or algebra over geometry) is just like preferring a California roll to chicken tikka masala. Do you want to know why playfulness is rampant in math and cooking? Or how to turn stinky cheese into an awesome ice cream treat? It’s all here: original math and original recipes plus the mathematical equivalents of vegetarianism, Asian fusion, and celebrity chefs.

Pleasurable and lighthearted, The Proof and the Pudding is a feast for the intellect as well as the palate. Jim Henle is the Myra M. Sampson Professor of Mathematics and Statistics at Smith College. His books include Sweet Reason: A Field Guide to Modern Logic and Calculus: The Language of Change. He lives in Northampton, Massachusetts.