King of pop Michael Jackson to get street name in Detroit

King of pop Michael Jackson to get street name in Detroit. (AFP)
Updated 19 May 2018

King of pop Michael Jackson to get street name in Detroit

CHICAGO: The king of pop will be honored in Motown with a street named Michael Jackson Avenue, officials announced on Thursday in Detroit.
The city, which has a rich history of nurturing American musical talent, will rename a portion of its Randolph Street in the downtown theater district in honor of the late entertainer.
The tribute comes 50 years after his family group known as the “Jackson 5” birthed their career with a successful recording contract audition in the Motor City.
“The Jacksons were among the first groups of black American performers to attain crossover status, and went on to release hit after hit after hit,” said city spokesman Stephen Grady.
Michael Jackson, who started with the group, went on to become one of the most famous performers in pop music history.
He died in 2009 at the age of 50 from a fatal dose of drugs, including the powerful anesthetic propofol.
The street renaming will take place June 15, coinciding with the Detroit Music Weekend outdoor festival, which Tito, Marlon, Jackie and Jermaine Jackson are scheduled to headline.
“This is where music comes from. This is where everybody copied the Motown sound,” Jackie Jackson said at a Detroit news conference.
The city honored another American music royalty during last year’s festival — naming a street after queen of soul Aretha Franklin.


Alaska man discovers 50-year-old message in bottle from Russian Navy

Updated 19 August 2019

Alaska man discovers 50-year-old message in bottle from Russian Navy

  • Then Russian Navy Capt. Anatolii Prokofievich Botsanenko wrote the letter when he was a 36-year-old aboard the Sulak
ANCHORAGE, Alaska: A man discovered a 50-year-old letter in a bottle from the Russian Navy on the shores of western Alaska.
Tyler Ivanoff found the handwritten Russian letter early this month while gathering firewood near Shishmaref about 600 miles (966 kilometers) northwest of Anchorage, television station KTUU reported.
“I was just looking for firewood when I found the bottle,” Tyler Ivanoff said. “When I found the bottle, I had to use a screwdriver to get the message out.”
Ivanoff shared his discovery on Facebook where Russian speakers translated the message to be a greeting from a Cold War Russian sailor dated June 20, 1969. The message included an address and a request for a response from the person who finds it.
Reporters from the state-owned Russian media network, Russia-1, tracked down the original writer, Capt. Anatolii Prokofievich Botsanenko, KTUU reported.
He was skeptical he wrote the note until he saw his signature on the bottom.
“There — exactly!” he exclaimed.
The message was sent while the then 36-year-old was aboard the Sulak, Botsanenko said. Botsanenko shed tears when the Russian television reporter told him the Sulak was sold for scrap in the 1990s.
Botsanenko also showed the reporter some souvenirs from his time on the ship, including the autograph of the wife of a famous Russian spy and Japanese liquor bottles, the latter kept over his wife’s protests.
Ivanoff’s discovery of the bottle was first reported by Nome radio station KNOM.