Meghan Markle’s nephew caught with knife blames Trump: report

Tyler Dooley, 25, allegedly fled from security guards after handing in the four-inch lock-knife, but was later confronted by officers at his hotel nearby. (Photo courtesy of Dooley's LinkedIn account)
Updated 21 May 2018
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Meghan Markle’s nephew caught with knife blames Trump: report

LONDON: Tyler Dooley, nephew of Britain’s newest royal Meghan Markle, took a knife to a London nightclub and then blamed Donald Trump’s warnings about the dangers of the British capital, The Sun reported on Monday.
The daily said Dooley, 25, a cannabis farmer who was not invited to the royal wedding in Windsor, handed the four-inch blade to a bouncer outside the club in Kingston, southwest London.
London’s Metropolitan Police did not name Dooley but confirmed they were called by security to the club “after a man openly declared he had a knife as he attempted to enter the club.”
The incident happened just hours after Saturday’s wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan.
“When officers arrived at 01.55 hrs enquiries led them to a hotel in Kingston and two men in their 20s were spoken to by officers in connection with the incident.
“One of the men also voluntarily surrendered a noxious spray. Both men, who were visitors to the UK, were warned about their actions,” the statement said.
“Neither was arrested, no further action was taken and enquiries are complete,” it added.
It is illegal to carry any knife in a public place in England except for folding pocket knives with blades measuring three inches (7.62 centimeters) or less.
Police commander Sally Benatar was quoted in the statement as saying: “The items were handed over voluntarily and there was no ongoing risk so the investigation was closed with warnings given.”
The Sun quoted Dooley as telling someone outside the club: “I just brought it because Donald Trump said London was like a warzone. I had it for protection.”
When contacted by a Sun reporter, the paper said Dooley “hid inside a bin cupboard” at his hotel.
Dooley flew into London last week with his brother and mother, the ex-wife of Markle’s half-brother Thomas, who was also not invited to the nuptials.
The run-up to the royal wedding was overshadowed by the media circus surrounding Markle’s family.
Her father pulled out at the last minute after getting caught up in a paparazzi scandal and then undergoing a heart operation while her mother was the only family member to attend.
Trump has stirred controversy with repeated references to security issues in Britain.
In a speech at the National Rifle Association in Texas this month, he talked about knife crime in London, comparing a hospital in the city to a “war zone.”
Knife-related crimes rose by 23 percent in London last year and a spate of stabbings and shootings have left more than 50 people dead this year.


No politics please for Baghdad bikers aiming to unite Iraq

Updated 20 January 2019
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No politics please for Baghdad bikers aiming to unite Iraq

  • That is why the first rule of his bikers club is: you do not talk about politics
  • The Iraq Bikers — who now number 380 — are men of all ages, social classes and various faiths

BAGHDAD: Roaring along Baghdad’s highways, the “Iraq Bikers” are doing more than showing off their love of outsized motorcycles and black leather: they want their shared enthusiasm to help heal Iraq’s deep sectarian rifts.
Weaving in and out of traffic, only the lucky few ride Harley Davidsons — a rare and expensive brand in Iraq — while others make do with bikes pimped-up to look something like the “Easy Rider” dream machines.
“Our goal is to build a brotherhood,” said Bilal Al-Bayati, 42, a government employee who founded the club in 2012 with the aim of improving the image of biker gangs and to promote unity after years of sectarian conflict.
That is why the first rule of his bikers club is: you do not talk about politics.
“It is absolutely prohibited to talk politics among members,” Bayati told Reuters as he sat with fellow bikers in a shisha cafe, a regular hangout for members.
“Whenever politics is mentioned, the members are warned once or twice and then expelled. We no longer have the strength to endure these tragedies or to repeat them,” he said, referring to sectarian violence.
With his black bandana and goatee, the leader of the Baghdad pack, known as “Captain,” looks the epitome of the American biker-outlaw.
But while their style is unmistakably US-inspired — at least one of Bayati’s cohorts wears a helmet emblazoned with the stars and stripes — these bikers fly the Iraqi flag from the panniers of their machines.
The Iraq Bikers — who now number 380 — are men of all ages, social classes and various faiths. One of their most recent events was taking party in Army Day celebrations.
Some are in the military, the police and even the Popular Mobilization Forces, a grouping of mostly Shiite militias which have taken part in the fight to oust Islamic State from Iraq in the last three years.
“It is a miniature Iraq,” said member Ahmed Haidar, 36, who works with an international relief agency.
But riding a chopper through Baghdad is quite different from Route 101. The bikers have to slow down at the many military checkpoints set up around the city to deter suicide and car bomb attacks.
And very few can afford a top bike.
“We don’t have a Harley Davidson franchise here,” said Kadhim Naji, a mechanic who specializes in turning ordinary motorbikes into something special.
“So what we do is we alter the motorbike, so it looks similar ... and it is cheaper.”