Start-up of the Week: Amirni – Making a difference in the field of logistics in Saudi Arabia

Updated 19 September 2018

Start-up of the Week: Amirni – Making a difference in the field of logistics in Saudi Arabia

  • Amirni.com is a one-stop shop where one can find all of its services and products
  • Clients can either call or use the chatting feature on the company’s app for all questions or concerns

JEDDAH: Amirni Express Co. (AX) is a Saudi-based logistics, mail and goods delivery company that provides on-demand delivery services through its own fleet of cars and drivers.
Established in 2016, AX currently covers Riyadh, Jeddah, Makkah, Dammam and Alkhobar. AX allows both the general public and businesses to send or receive anything, anywhere, and at any time within Saudi Arabia, and soon in the greater Gulf Cooperation Council region. All retailers and consumers can select products and set up a scheduled delivery time on demand by simply using the company’s app or through its website, or by calling directly.
Aiming to ease the life of Saudi consumers, AX was founded on the principle: “To Simplify and To Serve.” In an era of technology, it plays an effective role in the delivery of goods and services in an efficient and professional manner. The company’s main objective is to be available at all times and places providing technical delivery services using an application designed to service wherever you are in the Kingdom. Everything from restaurant deliveries to pharmaceutical pick-ups, and bulk services can be arranged.
Specifically, in the field of delivery services, Amirni Express Co. realizes the importance of pharmaceutical delivery. It offers its services 24 hours a day and seven days a week. Its website, Amirni.com is a one-stop shop where one can find all of its services and products. In addition, discounts and special offers are frequently presented to Amirni clients. By using state-of-the-art GPS technology, clients can track their orders and acquire the exact time of arrival. Clients can also choose their most convenient payment method, as all of their vehicles are equipped with a point-of-sale system that accepts debit and credit cards. Clients have the payment options of ATM, or cash, or via MADA network.
Amirni CEO, Abdullah Alnajar described what is next for his company. “In the near future, each of our consumers will have access to Moe-Bot, an in-app A.I. Assistant, who will help them save money in addition to anticipating their needs before they are requested so that their needs are readily available by the time they are desired. We are morphing into an artificially intelligent ecosystem that profoundly understands each consumer and supplier!”
Since Amirni’s goal is to enrich delivery services and make it easily accessible to customers, it manages all data, orders, and requests through their own in-house call center. Clients can either call or use the chatting feature on the company’s app for all questions or concerns. The call center is available at all hours of operations (8 a.m. to 2 a.m.).


Currency smugglers caught at Madinah airport

Updated 17 August 2019

Currency smugglers caught at Madinah airport

  • The passengers, who hid the money in their luggage, were intending to travel to four different destinations
  • Saudi Customs said that the Anti-Money Laundering Law requires all passengers carrying cash or precious metals that exceed the value of SR60,000 to complete a declaration form

MADINAH: Four passengers were caught attempting to smuggle SR3.093 million ($804,010) out of Prince Mohammed bin Abdulaziz International Airport in Madinah.
The passengers, who hid the money in their luggage, were intending to travel to four different destinations, Saudi Press Agency reported. 
Ahmad Al-Ghamdi, director of customs at the airport, said that the first attempt consisted of SR948,300 hidden in the passenger’s clothes.
He added that another attempt used the same strategy, and customs found SR679,000 in his clothes.
In the third attempt, the smuggler tried to conceal SR415,500 in metal cans hidden in his luggage.
The fourth passenger attempted to hide SR1.050 million in a pair of trousers in his luggage.
Al-Ghamdi added that the smugglers could not prove the legitimacy of the money, which reinforced the possibility of it being related to money laundering.
Saudi Customs said that the Anti-Money Laundering Law requires all passengers carrying cash or precious metals that exceed the value of SR60,000 to complete a declaration form. Failing to do so would be considered an explicit breach of the law.