‘Pain au chocolat’ a pain in the neck for French parliament

Screen grab showing different price depending on what the pastry is called (BFMTV)
Updated 24 May 2018
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‘Pain au chocolat’ a pain in the neck for French parliament

PARIS: The French phrasebooks may have to remove the term ‘pain au chocolat’, one of the few French phrases that many tourists can muster, from the food chapter, if some French lawmakers get their way.
Their amendment is one of thousands holding up the passage of a new French food law. The lawmakers from Gascony, better known for its rugby, bull running and duck-meat delicacies, say the sweet pastry they call “chocolatine” originates from their region.
Aurelien Pradie and other right-wing MPs from the area say the law should be more supportive of local gastronomy, including “a pastry whose name historically draws on origins in the Gascony region and which is the pride of the south of France.”
Little matter that most of the children across the rest of France who traditionally get a pain au chocolat at the end of their school day would struggle to recognize the term.
But Amendment 2064’s chances of making it into law may anyway be slim, as it competes for debating time with weightier proposals on improving food safety or banning pesticides.


French football fans queue for shirt carrying second star

Updated 17 August 2018
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French football fans queue for shirt carrying second star

  • National team’s new shirts carry a second star to mark Les Bleus’ World Cup win in Russia
  • The Nike-branded strips are huge money-spinners costing €85 euros each

PARIS: Scores of French football fans queued on Friday to snap up the first of the national team’s new shirts carrying a second star to mark Les Bleus’ World Cup win in Russia.
The crowning of France as world champions unleashed a wave of euphoria across the country, helping foster a brief sense of national unity after years of tension and self-examination in the wake of attacks by militants since 2015.
“I’ll keep it all my life. It’s the second star! They made our dreams come true on the pitch,” said fan Brice Chevalier as he queued to enter the French Football Federation’s store in Paris.
France first won the World Cup, earning its first star, in 1998 with Zinedine Zidane its talisman and playmaker in an era when the team was referred to as Black-Blanc-Beur (Black-White-Arab), a reference to its diverse ethnic make up.
In Russia, they beat Croatia 4-2, with President Emmanuel Macron leaping for joy in the stands.
“I’m chuffed, I’ve been waiting a month for this moment,” said another life-long supporter, Jerome Cornec.
The Nike-branded strips are huge money-spinners. France’s official shirt costs €85 euros ($97).