App Watch: Mobile app is right on the money

Updated 25 May 2018
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App Watch: Mobile app is right on the money

  • Masareef’s founders, Nawaf Hareeri and Nour Ahmadein, developed the app to help users monitor their personal expenses and income.

A Saudi mobile app, Masareef, that allows users to keep tabs on where their money goes every month, is being downloaded every two minutes.

This smart, efficient application is ideal for those who struggle to rein in their spending and end up with empty pockets halfway through the month.

Masareef’s founders, Nawaf Hareeri and Nour Ahmadein, developed the app to help users monitor their personal expenses and income.

Using the app is easy, with a tutorial set up after the launch offering concise instructions.

Simply enter the date your salary arrives, the amount you are paid and how much you’re hoping to save and the app will do the rest. It will also separate your bills, groceries, daily spending and other payments for the month.

The app offers daily reminders on how much you’ve spent and what bills need paying.

Users can also set up short- or long-term financial goals, such as buying a new phone or a planning a travel adventure, and keep tabs on how much has been saved to accomplish it.

Masareef saves users’ time, and helps those with short memories keep tabs on their payments.


First sounds of wind on Mars captured by InSight spacecraft

Updated 09 December 2018
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First sounds of wind on Mars captured by InSight spacecraft

  • 20 second audio clip shows sound of wind on Mars
  • Clip also supports evidence of wind speed and direction on Mars

DUBAI: An audio clip of the first sounds captured on Mars by its latest inhabitant, the InSight probe, was released last week, British broadcaster BBC reported.

The clip, 20 seconds long, has captured the sound of the wind on the desert planet.

InSight carries a British-made seismometer package, which was able to detect the vibrations from Martian air rushing over the solar panels.

Professor Tom Pike, leading the seismometer experiment from Imperial College London, likened the placement of the solar panels to the robot “cupping its ears”. “[They are] the perfect acoustic receivers.” he said.

The wind on Mars moves from the northeast to the southeast at about five to seven meters per second, according to the latest estimates. This falls in line with evidence shown by satellite pictures that display the tracks left by dust devils travelling in the same direction.

 “This is brilliant news because it means we know the sensors have survived the rigors of landing on Mars and are meeting the requirements to achieve their science goals,” Sue Horne, head of space exploration at the UK Space Agency, told the BBC.

“It is just amazing to hear the first ever sounds from Mars,” Horne added.

InSight landed on Mars on November 26th, following a six-month journey from Earth. Its overall aim is to study the world's interior from the mission site, a flat plain just north of Mars's equator.