Trump says summit with North Korea could still go ahead

US President Donald Trump speaks to the press on his way to board Marine One from the South Lawn of the White House on May 25, 2018 in Washington, DC. Trump is heading to Annapolis, Maryland to attend the US Naval Academy graduation and commissioning ceremony. (AFP)
Updated 25 May 2018
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Trump says summit with North Korea could still go ahead

  • In a letter to Kim, Trump said Thursday he would not go ahead with the summit in Singapore, following what the White House called a “trail of broken promises” by the North.
  • Trump said Friday that the meeting with Kim Jong Un could still go ahead.

WASHINGTON: US President Donald Trump, a day after his cancellation of a high-stakes summit with North Korea, said Friday that the meeting with Kim Jong Un could still go ahead.
“We’re going to see what happens,” Trump told reporters at the White House, after welcoming Pyongyang’s latest statement on the talks as “very good news.”
“It could even be the 12th,” he said in a reference to the original June 12 date set for the meeting in Singapore.
“We’re talking to them now,” Trump said of the North Koreans. “They very much want to do it. We’d like to do it. We’ll see what happens.”
North Korea, responding to Trump’s abrupt cancelation of the meeting over “hostility” from Pyongyang, said Friday that it is willing to talk to the United States “at any time.”
Trump welcomed the statement as “warm and productive.”
“We will soon see where it will lead, hopefully to long and enduring prosperity and peace. Only time (and talent) will tell!” the US president said in a tweet.
In a letter to Kim, Trump said Thursday he would not go ahead with the summit in Singapore, following what the White House called a “trail of broken promises” by the North.
Trump blamed “open hostility” from Kim’s regime for his decision to call off the talks, and warned North Korea against committing any “foolish or reckless acts.”
But Pyongyang’s reaction to the sudden U-turn has so far been conciliatory.
First Vice Foreign Minister Kim Kye Gwan called Trump’s decision “unexpected” and “regrettable.” But he left the door open for talks, saying officials were willing “to sit face-to-face at any time.”
Just before Trump announced the cancelation of the meeting, North Korea declared it had “completely” dismantled its nuclear test site in the country’s far northeast, in a carefully choreographed goodwill gesture ahead of the summit.
But the chances of success for the unprecedented face-to-face had recently been thrown into doubt as threats were traded by both sides.


Canadian leaders condemn arson at mosque

Edson mosque
Updated 57 min 54 sec ago
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Canadian leaders condemn arson at mosque

OTTAWA: Canadian leaders on Monday condemned a “brazen” act of arson at an Alberta mosque as Muslims around the world celebrated the end of Ramadan.
The mosque in the town of Edson was set ablaze Saturday night, blackening the entrance to the building but otherwise causing no injuries and little damage.
“All of Canada stands together with the community against this brazen act, which is under investigation. Everyone has the right to practice their faith without fear,” Canada’s Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale said on Twitter.
Surveillance footage showed a person in a dark hoodie carrying a jerrycan fleeing the mosque at about 11 p.m. local time Saturday (0300 GMT Sunday).
The 30-year-old mosque serves as a place of worship for 15 families in Edson, about 200 kilometers (125 miles) west of Edmonton.
Alberta’s social democratic Premier Rachel Notley called the arson an “affront to all Albertans” and she renewed her government’s commitment to “fighting racism in all its forms.”
The province’s Conservative leader Jason Kenney called it “an attack on freedom” while vowing solidarity “with our Muslim neighbors against such acts of hatred.”