Saudi women ‘taking control of their finances’

More than 50 women attended the event, hosted by global finance group Jersey Finance.
Updated 26 May 2018
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Saudi women ‘taking control of their finances’

  • Women are taking a much more direct and hands-on role in wealth management
  • Jersey Finance was established in 2001 to promote Jersey and work with foreign direct investment

JEDDAH: Women in Saudi Arabia are taking more control of their finances in both their personal and professional lives, according to a leading UK finance expert.
Amy Bryant, deputy chief executive officer at Jersey Finance, said the knowledge on wealth management gained by the current generation of Saudi women would also “influence the approach future generations take toward their finances.”
Bryant was speaking on the sidelines of a women-only talk hosted by Jersey Finance, the global finance group.

Growing demand
More than 50 women attended the event, Jersey Finance’s fifth in partnership with the Department for International Trade — but this was the first female-only talk.
The event was organized in response to the growing demand by Saudi women for greater control over their financial future.


The event’s keynote speaker was Ida Beerhalter, co-head of IOME, a Riyadh-based private investment partnership of women principals from the GCC region.
Topics included: Learning about and managing finance as a woman; understanding and managing offshore accounts; wealth protection for the future and succession planning; living with newfound wealth; the impact of children’s decisions — financial and otherwise — on family wealth; and the effect of health on wealth and finances.

Wealth management
“As the Saudi landscape evolves, the level of enthusiasm displayed at events such as this shows that more women are looking to become involved in business, their own finances and that of their family,” Bryant said.
“Women are taking a much more direct and hands-on role in wealth management — or at least educating themselves more on the subjects — in the scope of both their personal and professional lives. This knowledge could also influence the approach future generations take toward their finances,” she said.
Jersey Finance was established in 2001 to promote Jersey and work with foreign direct investment. The non-profit company aims to create a safe and secure environment for investors and families, and also works to strengthen local and international companies.
The finance group has increased its investment in the region, in particular with Saudi Arabia.
In recent years, it has collaborated with the British Embassy in Riyadh and the British Consulate in Jeddah to host annual receptions, and also developed relationships with key industry professionals.


Riyadh Eid festivities draw more than 1.5 million visitors

Updated 19 June 2018
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Riyadh Eid festivities draw more than 1.5 million visitors

  • The diversity of events the municipality provided this year offered plenty of choice to the capital’s residents and visitors.
  • The garden of King Fahd Library which received visitors over the three days of Eid witnessed interactive and entertainment shows.

JEDDAH: Riyadh municipality Eid Al-Fitr activities attracted more than 1.5 million visitors, residents and citizens over the three-day holiday.
The diversity of events the municipality provided this year offered plenty of choice to the capital’s residents and visitors.
The municipality hosted 200 functions in 30 different locations across the city. It distributed thousands of presents, balloons and candy to children to encourage them to attend Eid prayers and to bring joy to their hearts.
Riyadh’s Eid festivities in Qasr AL-Hokm included the Saudi traditional folk-dance show, activities and competitions for children, as well as folk arts and poetry shows.
The garden of King Fahd Library which received visitors over the three days of Eid witnessed interactive and entertainment shows, as well as artistic activities and sports competitions.
Riyadh municipality organized five theater shows for men and women, including two for men: Shekka Wa Noss, and Tersam Al-Wahch; two plays for women: Banat Al-Social and Umm Suwaileh Al-Sawaqa, and an open play, Al-Qarya Al-Maghdoura.
Riyadh municipality also organized three theater shows for the blind and deaf.
“Al-Qarya Al-Maghdoura” (The Betrayed Village), the first open-theater show in the Kingdom, was held in the showroom of Al-Jazeera neighborhood. It was written, directed and played by Saudis.
The municipality allocated several events and locations for the participation of humanitarian organizations by receiving them and setting private seats for them, in coordination with the Saudi Association for Deaf.
It also organized a special program to entertain women and children over the three days of Eid. The events for women included plays, free drawing and coloring sessions, artifacts and competitions.
Carnival marches were launched in the north and west of Riyadh, by 300 cartoon characters and featured the participation of touring folk groups, along with a solidarity march with soldiers, as well as classic car shows.
The capital’s residents and visitors enjoyed fireworks that lasted 10 minutes and colored the sky of Riyadh at King Fahd International Stadium, a location near King Abdullah Financial District (KAFD) and a location near Wadi Leban Bridge in west Riyadh.