Bored? Six movies made in Lebanon you have to watch today

A still from the film 'Ghadi.' (Photo supplied)
Updated 27 May 2018
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Bored? Six movies made in Lebanon you have to watch today

DUBAI: Lebanese Director Nadine Labaki’s heart-breaking drama, “Capharnaüm,” is going from strength to strength, having won big in Cannes last week, but it’s not the only piece of cinematic history to be set in Lebanon. If you're truly the arty type, you would not let a language barrier get in the way so stick on the subtitles, or find someone who is willing to translate, and enjoy!

‘West Beirut’ (1998)

Ziad Doueiri’s hit received heaps of praise following its release. The plot follows a group of youths navigating around the struggles that erupted following the start of the 1975 Lebanese Civil War in a wonderfully balanced comedic and dramatic narrative.

‘Caramel’ (2007)

Directed by Nadine Labaki, the film follows the lives of five Lebanese women as they face the everyday problems that haunt them. It’s a fun break away from the usual politically charged films set in the country.

‘Very Big Shot’ (2015)

“Film Kteer Kbir” in Arabic, this flick follows the efforts of a minor drug dealer and his brothers from a working-class area of Beirut as they try to pull off the biggest drug smuggle of their careers by moving the goods through a fake film set. Think “Argo” meets “Scarface” — sort of.

‘The Insult’ (2017)

Lebanon’s first nomination at the Academy Awards was Ziad Doueiri’s “The Insult” in 2018. It follows a court case between a Christian Lebanese man and a Muslim Palestinian refugee after an altercation between the two.

‘Ghadi’ (2013)

Written by famous Lebanese comedy actor Georges Khabbaz, “Ghadi” follows the story of how the family of a young child with special needs tricks their village into thinking he’s an angel after the town seeks to evict him.

‘Zozo’ (2005)

Zozo takes place against the backdrop of the 1975 Lebanese Civil War. As citizens flee the country and its dangers, a Lebanese boy gets separated from his family and ends up in Sweden. The film draws inspiration from director Josef Fares’ own experience fleeing the war.


Bong d’Or: Korean director wins Cannes’ top prize

Updated 25 May 2019
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Bong d’Or: Korean director wins Cannes’ top prize

  • French-Senegalese director Mati Diop’s “Atlantics" wins festival’s second place award, the Grand Prize
  • Belgian brothers Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne shared the best director for “Young Ahmed”

CANNES, France: South Korean director Bong Joon-ho’s social satire “Parasite,” about a poor family of hustlers who find jobs with a wealthy family, won the Cannes Film Festival’s top award, the Palme d’Or, on Saturday.
The win for “Parasite” marks the first Korean film to ever win the Palme. In the festival’s closing ceremony, jury president Alejandro Inarritu said the choice had been “unanimous” for the nine-person jury.
The genre-mixing film had been celebrated as arguably the most critically acclaimed film at Cannes this year and the best yet from the 49-year-old director of “Snowpiercer” and “Okja.”
It was the second straight Palme victory for an Asian director. Last year, the award went to Japanese filmmaker Hirokazu Kore-eda’s “Shoplifters.”
Two years ago, Bong was in Cannes’ competition with “Okja,” a movie distributed in North America by Netflix. After it and Noah Baumbach’s “The Meyerowitz Stories” — another Netflix release — premiered in Cannes, the festival ruled that all films in competition needed French theatrical distribution. Netflix has since withdrawn from the festival on the French Riveira.
The festival’s second place award, the Grand Prize, went to French-Senegalese director Mati Diop’s “Atlantics.” Diop was the first black female director in competition at Cannes.
Belgian brothers Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne shared the best director for “Young Ahmed.”
Best actor went to Antonio Banderas for Pedro Almodovar’s “Pain and Glory,” while best actress was won by British actress Emily Beecham for “Little Joe.”
Although few quibbled with the choice of Bong, some had expected Cannes to make history by giving the Palme to a female filmmaker for just the second time.
Celine Sciamma’s period romance “Portrait of a Lady on Fire” was the Palme pick for many critics this year, but it ended up with best screenplay.
In the festival’s 72-year history, only Jane Champion has won the prize in 1993, and she tied with Chen Kaige’s “Farewell My Concubine.”