Pair of Japanese premium melons sell for record $29,300

A pair of Yubari melons, that fetched a record 3.2 million yen ($29,300) at an auction, are seen in Sapporo on May 26, 2018. The single pair of premium melons on May 26 fetched a record 3.2 million yen ($29,300) at an auction in Japan, where the produce can be a huge status symbol. (AFP)
Updated 26 May 2018
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Pair of Japanese premium melons sell for record $29,300

  • Yubari melons are considered a status symbol in Japan with many being bought as a gift for friends and colleagues.
  • Ordinary fruit is comparatively expensive in Japan and it is not unusual for a single apple to cost as much as $3.

TOKYO: A single pair of premium melons on Saturday fetched a record 3.2 million yen ($29,300) at auction in Japan, where the fruit is regarded as a status symbol.
Seasonal fruit offerings in Japan routinely attract massive sums from buyers seeking social prestige, or from shop owners wanting to attract customers to “ooh and aah” over the extravagant edibles.
The winning bid was placed by a local fruit packing firm for the first Yubari melons to go under the hammer this year at the Sapporo Central Wholesale Market in northern Hokkaido, officials said.
The figure — enough to buy a new car in Japan — topped the previous record for the luxury fruit, which fetched 3.0 million yen two years ago.
“Yubari melons are growing well this year as sunshine hours have been long since early May,” said market official Tatsuro Shibuta.
Yubari melons are considered a status symbol in Japan — like a fine wine — with many being bought as a gift for friends and colleagues.
The best-quality Yubari melons are perfect spheres with a smooth, evenly patterned rind. A T-shaped stalk is left on the fruit, which is usually sold in an ornate box.
Even ordinary fruit is comparatively expensive in Japan and it is not unusual for a single apple to cost as much as $3.


Farah the Falcon swoops in to predict World Cup results, but will Saudi Arabia win?

Updated 20 June 2018
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Farah the Falcon swoops in to predict World Cup results, but will Saudi Arabia win?

  • More than half her predictions have been accurate, although she was wrong about Egypt
  • Now see her make her swoop for the next Saudi Arabian match

DUBAI: South Africa’s World Cup had Paul the Octopus in 2010, Brazil’s World Cup had Big Head the loggerhead turtle in 2014, now Russia’s World Cup has Farah the Falcon.

However, the feathered flyer predicted Egypt to come out triumphant in Tuesday night’s game against host’s Russia - but the outcome was the opposite.

Farah guessed Saudi Arabia would lose its second game at the tournament against Uruguay on Wednesday.

This is not what any Saudi Arabia fan wants to see (Screenshot/Youtube: Dubai Eye 103.8 Sport)

It has been a rough group stage for Arab nations with all four countries losing their games so far.

Swooping in from her perch on the arm of her trainer, Farah – who is sponsored by UAE-based radio station Dubai Eye – glides towards one of two wooden flags bearing the colors of the countries playing against each other.

The flag she lands on is her predicted winner for the game.

So far, 10 of the 17 games played have been predicted correctly – with two of those ending in draws and seven ending with the predicted winner actually losing. This makes her accuracy at 58.8 percent.

Tunisia is predicted to lose its games on Saturday against Belgium, with Morocco set to suffer the same fate against Portugal on Wednesday according to the feathered foreseer.

Paul the Octopus was the most famous of the animal predictors, predicting 12 out of 14 matches correctly with an accuracy of 85.7 percent.

See how Farah made her Saudi Arabia v Uruguay prediction