48 killed as Uganda bus rams into tractor and truck

Police officers work on the site of a accident between a truck and a bus, resulting in 14 deaths and 17 injuries, on a highway in Kampala on September 17, 2017. (File photo: AFP)
Updated 26 May 2018
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48 killed as Uganda bus rams into tractor and truck

  • Uganda has one of the worst records for road safety

KAMPALA: At least 48 people including 16 children died in northern Uganda when a bus hit a tractor driving with no lights at night and then a truck, the Red Cross said Saturday.
“Evacuation teams are working tirelessly to rescue the injured,” said Ugandan police spokeswoman Emilian Kayima, adding that all three drivers had died.
“The death toll is now at 48 including 16 children,” Red Cross spokeswoman Irene Nakasiita told AFP.
The accident happened on Friday night in Kiryandongo, about 220 kilometers (140 miles) north of the capital Kampala.
The bus collided first with the tractor before hitting a truck transporting beer.
Local media said the death toll exceeded 30.
Uganda has one of the worst records for road safety, due to the poor condition of vehicles and roads as well as dangerous driving.
More than 9,500 people died in a road accident in the country between 2015 and 2017, according to figures from the transport ministry, with the situation worsening each year.


China suspends Canadian meat imports amid Huawei dispute

Updated 26 June 2019
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China suspends Canadian meat imports amid Huawei dispute

  • The latest action against Canada comes as Prime Minister Justin Trudeau heads to Japan for the G-20 summit
  • Before acting against Canadian meat, China previously stopped importing certain Canadian products like canola

TORONTO: China is suspending all meat imports from Canada amid their dispute over the Canadian detention of a top executive at the Chinese tech company Huawei.
The Chinese Embassy in Ottawa said in a statement on its website Tuesday that the move follows Chinese customs inspectors’ detection of residue from a restricted feed additive, called ractopamine, in a batch of Canadian pork products. It is permitted in Canada but banned in China.
“China has taken urgent preventive measures and requested the Canadian government to suspend the issuance of certificates for meat exported to China,” the statement said.
Meng Wanzhou, the Huawei CFO and daughter of the company’s founder, was arrested Dec. 1 in Canada at the request of US authorities, who want to try her on fraud charges.
China then detained two Canadians and sentenced another to death in an apparent attempt to pressure for her release.
The latest action against Canada comes as Prime Minister Justin Trudeau heads to Japan for the G-20 summit. US President Donald Trump is expected to meet with his Chinese counterpart amid trade talks.
Meng’s arrest set off a diplomatic furor among the three countries, complicating high-stakes US-China trade talks and severely damaging Beijing’s relations with Ottawa. Canada wants Trump to speak on behalf of Canada to Chinese President Xi Jinping. The Chinese have refused to talk to senior Canadian government officials, including Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland. Trudeau had hoped to meet with Xi at the G-20 but that appears unlikely.
Before acting against Canadian meat, China previously stopped importing certain Canadian products like canola.
Justine Lesage, a spokeswoman for Canada’s agriculture minister, said in a statement that the Canadian Food and Inspection Agency identified an issue involving inauthentic export certificates that could affect the export of pork and beef products to China.
She said the agency has “taken measures to address this issue and is continuing to work closely with industry partners and Chinese officials.”
“The Canadian food system is one of the best in the world and we are confident in the safety of Canadian products and Canadian exports,” she said.