Muslim World League launches second relief campaign to help Yemeni refugees

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The campaign seeks to distribute 3,000 food baskets in the three remaining governorates
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The campaign seeks to distribute 3,000 food baskets in the three remaining governorates
Updated 27 May 2018
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Muslim World League launches second relief campaign to help Yemeni refugees

  • MWL provided relief and health assistance to the neediest people in Yemen
  • The campaign includes the distribution of 5,000 food baskets among Yemeni refugees in the governorate of Hajjah

JEDDAH: The Muslim World League (MWL) has launched its second urgent relief campaign to help Yemeni refugees in the governorates of Marib, Al-Jawf, Shabwah, Abyan and Hajjah, as part of the UN’s 2018 Yemen Humanitarian Response Plan, which seeks $2.96 billion to provide life-saving assistance to 13.1 million people this year.
This campaign comes within the framework of the comprehensive programs implemented by the International Association for Relief, Care and Development (IARCD), an affiliate of MWL for the purpose of alleviating the suffering of the people of Yemen, and covering the needs of the displaced people and refugees.
The secretary-general of the IARCD, Abdul Aziz Sarhan, said the campaign includes the distribution of 5,000 food baskets among Yemeni refugees in the governorate of Hajjah. “The campaign also seeks to distribute 3,000 food baskets in the three remaining governorates, whereas 1,200 baskets will be distributed in Al-Jawf,” he said.
Sarhan pointed out that the MWL provided relief and health assistance to the neediest people in Yemen, amounting to SR102,855,293 ($27,425,520.47) from which more than 2,361,398 people have benefited. He stressed that the league would implement many humanitarian projects to support the Yemeni people in all Yemeni governorates.


A man and his dog — bonded through Arab history

Updated 4 min 44 sec ago
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A man and his dog — bonded through Arab history

  • The image is the earliest evidence for the use of leashes to control dogs, with the earliest records previously found in Egypt, dating from 5,500 years ago
JEDDAH: Recent engravings discovered in northwestern Saudi Arabia depicting a man with a pack of hunting dogs are thought to be among the oldest records of man domesticating animals in the world.
Estimated to date back more than 9,000 years, the engravings, found at Shuwaymis and Jubbah, show a man drawing his bow and arrow surrounded by thirteen dogs, each with unique coat markings, and two on leads.
The area is home to over 1,400 rock carving panels, but these are now considered to be the crown jewel for the subject they convey, according to Maria Guagnin, an archaeologist at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena, Germany, which is overseeing the site in partnership with the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage.
Despite the fact that Guagnin and her team cannot precisely date the panel, the condition of the rock and the sequence of the engraving suggest they date back at least nine millennia. However, there remains conflict over when domesticated dogs first arrived on the Arabian peninsula, and whether these animals were descended from the Arabian wold, or dogs tamed by other peoples abroad, somewhere between 15,000 to 30,000 years ago.
Certainly, the image is the earliest evidence for the use of leashes to control dogs, with the earliest records previously found in Egypt, dating from 5,500 years ago. 

Speculation for their development is also unclear — perhaps the leashed animals were more valuable than the others, or maybe the images depict a way to train new dogs.