FaceOf: Bader Al-Asaker, secretary-general of Misk Foundation

Bader Al-Asaker
Updated 28 May 2018
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FaceOf: Bader Al-Asaker, secretary-general of Misk Foundation

  • Al-Asaker is also the secretary-general of the King Salman Youth Center

Prince Mohammed bin Salman bin Abdulaziz Foundation, commonly known as Misk, is a non-profit foundation devoted to cultivating learning and leadership in Saudi youth.

The Misk Innovation initiative is currently taking part in the International Technology Fair “VivaTech” in Paris.

This is the first participation of its kind to support the emerging technological creations of a number of innovators from the Kingdom’s youth.

In its pavilion, Misk presented seven technological innovations in various fields, including those that serve the hearing-impaired through technical support, the aviation industry, automotive electronic solutions, road safety, Arabic and international media monitoring, and the perfume industry.

Bader Al-Asaker is the secretary-general of Misk Foundation.  Al-Asaker is also the secretary-general of the King Salman Youth Center. 

Al-Asaker is also head of the private office for Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman with the rank of minister since he was appointed by a royal decree in July 2017.

He is a member of the Council of Saudi Chambers, and a member of the Youth Business Committee at the Chamber of Commerce and Industry in Riyadh.

He is also the deputy general director of Alasaker for Electronic Systems and AC in Riyadh, which was established in 1980 and has around 10 branches in Riyadh city. He is also a member of the board of directors of Riyadh Schools and has previously served as deputy CEO of Salhia Dates and Sweets Co.

Al-Asaker holds a bachelor’s degree from King Saud University, Riyadh. He has a profound influence on the social networking platforms especially Twitter, where he is followed up on his personal account by more than 1 million users. 


Majlis culture brings a little Saudi warmth to freezing Davos

At a five-star hotel in Davos, the Saudi Arabia General Investment Authority has sponsored a prominent display proclaiming ‘The future-forward economy — Invest Saudi.’ (AN photo)
Updated 23 January 2019
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Majlis culture brings a little Saudi warmth to freezing Davos

  • The Misk Pavilion is one of the many signs of the Kingdom’s enthusiastic involvement in the world’s biggest gathering of political, business and thought leaders

DAVOS: From the sub-zero temperatures of the icy Davos Promenade you are ushered through a glass door into the warmth of a desert majlis, with works by young Saudi artists on the walls and traditional Arabian delicacies being served. It is quite a culture shock.

The Davos majlis is the work of the Misk Global Forum (MGF), the international arm of the organization founded by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman to promote youth empowerment. 

The Misk Pavilion is one of the many signs of the Kingdom’s enthusiastic involvement in the world’s biggest gathering of political, business and thought leaders.

“The Kingdom’s participation in WEF 2019 highlights its role in developing the regional and global economy, and reflects the nation’s continuing ambition for sustainable development,” said Bader Al-Asaker, head of the crown prince’s private office and chairman of the Misk Initiatives Center. 

The Saudi delegation’s HQ overlooks the main congress hall, inside the Davos security cordon. 

At a nearby five-star hotel, the Saudi Arabia General Investment Authority has sponsored a prominent display proclaiming: “The future-forward economy — Invest Saudi.” 

This is the second year Misk has been prominent at Davos. As well as the majlis, its pavilion offers visitors the chance to immerse themselves in modern Saudi art via a virtual reality tour of the work of four young artists.

Misk is organizing daily events there, building up to a power breakfast with leading executives on Friday on the theme of youth empowerment.

“In an age of profound economic disruption, we regard young people as the problem-solvers, not a problem to be solved,” said MGF executive manager Shaima Hamidaddin.

“We’re holding interactive discussions on how to empower young people to be the architects of the future economy, not the tenants of it.”