Pakistani clerics laud Kingdoms efforts for the sanctity of Two Holy Mosques

Hafiz Muhammad Tahir Mehmood Ashrafi, Chairman Pakistan Ulema Council chaired the conference “Tahafuz-e-Harmain Al Sharifain, Al-Aqsa Conference” or Projection Two Holy Mosques and Al-Aqsa. (Photo courtesy: Hafiz Tahir Ashrafi)
Updated 28 May 2018
0

Pakistani clerics laud Kingdoms efforts for the sanctity of Two Holy Mosques

  • The clerics lauded Saudi efforts to secure and defend the Two Holy Mosques, and to support the Palestinian cause
  • It is the Muslim world’s responsibility to foil all attacks and conspiracies against the Two Holy Mosques in Saudi Arabia and Al-Aqsa Mosque in Jerusalem, clerics said

ISLAMABAD: It is the Muslim world’s responsibility to foil all attacks and conspiracies against the Two Holy Mosques in Saudi Arabia and Al-Aqsa Mosque in Jerusalem, clerics and representatives of various religious and political organizations said at a conference on Monday.
The conference was chaired by Hafiz Muhammad Tahir Mehmood Ashrafi, chairman of the Pakistan Ulema Council.
The clerics lauded Saudi efforts to secure and defend the Two Holy Mosques, and to support the Palestinian cause.
Proactive and practical steps are needed to thwart attempts to divide the Muslim world along sectarian lines, they said.
“A catastrophe is being carried out in Muslim countries by fanning sectarian differences,” Ashrafi told Arab News.
The conference demanded action against Houthi rebels in Yemen and their supporters for the launching of ballistic missiles at Saudi Arabia.


British minister demands Germany lifts block on Saudi arms sales

Updated 41 min 29 sec ago
0

British minister demands Germany lifts block on Saudi arms sales

  • Jeremy Hunt says Berlin’s halt in arms sales to KSA will hit UK defense industry
  • Requests major European defense projects like the Eurofighter be removed from embargo

LONDON: Britain’s top diplomat has demanded that Germany lifts its effective block on major European arms sales to Saudi Arabia, saying the move stands to hurt the UK’s defense industry.

Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt wrote to Heiko Maas, his German counterpart, requesting that Berlin exclude the likes of the Euroflighter Typhoon and the Tornado fighter jet from its embargo.

Parts of those jets are made in Germany, meaning that their sale to Saudi Arabia is essentially blocked even though the deals might be struck by defense companies headquartered elsewhere.

Hunt expressed concern about the effect of Germany’s halt in exports to Saudi Arabia on both the British and wider European defense industry, Der Spiegel reported on Tuesday.

“I am very concerned about the impact of the German government’s decision on the British and European defense industry and the consequences for Europe’s ability to fulfil its NATO commitments,” Hunt wrote in the letter to Maas, according to Der Spiegel.

“It is imperative that you immediately remove major European defense projects such as the Eurofighter and the Tornado from the arms embargo,” he wrote in the letter dated Feb. 7. Otherwise, Berlin risks “a loss of confidence in the credibility of Germany as a partner.”

Hunt said British defense firms would not be able to fulfil several contracts with Saudi Arabia such as the Eurofighter Typhoon.

Eurofighter is built by a consortium of four founding countries — Britain, Germany, Italy and Spain — and is represented by France’s Airbus, Britain’s BAE Systems and Italy’s Leonardo.

An official from Airbus last week said Germany’s halt in exports to Saudi Arabia is preventing Britain from completing the sale of 48 Eurofighter Typhoons to Riyadh, and has delayed potential sales of other weapons.

Airbus Defense and Space chief Dirk Hoke told Reuters that uncertainty about the issue had undermined Germany’s credibility, and could threaten future Franco-German defense projects.

“This is a serious problem,” Hoke was reported as saying. “We’re facing constraints in many projects, and many problems have been put on ice.”

Germany imposed the embargo in November, saying it would reject future export licenses to Saudi Arabia after the killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi. It has not formally banned previously approved deals, which would entitle companies to compensation, but has urged industry to refrain from such shipments for now, Reuters reported.