Saudi bank lending climbs on real estate loans

Bank lending is on the rise again in Saudi Arabia helping to boost retail and real estate spending. (Getty Images)
Updated 29 May 2018
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Saudi bank lending climbs on real estate loans

  • Total real estate loans rise 5.7 percent in first quarter yoy
  • Oil price recovery helps to boost overall bank lending

Bank lending to the private sector in Saudi Arabia rose in April, providing a tentative sign that confidence in the Kingdom’s economy is returning, say analysts.

Total bank credit to the private sector increased by about 0.7 percent compared to the same month the previous year, according to Saudi Arabian Monetary Authority (SAMA) data.

“It’s a hard indicator to read, but it may be a sign that Saudi consumers and business people feel less uncertain about the future and a bit more secure. It is probably linked to the return to fiscal expansion,” said Marcus Chenevix, a Middle East and North Africa analyst at TS Lombard in London.

“However, Saudi Arabia has a comparatively underdeveloped banking sector for its level of per-capita wealth, meaning that this is an area in which we would expect to see pretty strong growth.”

The loan growth was put down in part to a revival in the property sector.

“Lending growth was driven primarily by the construction sector and the real estate retail loans in the first quarter,’ said Mohamed Damak, senior director, financial institutions ratings at S&P Global.

Total real estate loans by banks in the first quarter this year increased by 5.7 percent compared to the same quarter the previous year.

“Under our base case scenario, we expect slight lending growth in 2018 explained by a higher GDP growth in 2018,” he said.

Ashraf Madani, vice president, senior analyst at rating agency Moody’s Investors Service, agreed that lending is likely to rise this year. “We expect credit demand to increase in 2018 boosted by the planned increases in government capital expenditure,” he said.

The April data also revealed that SAMA’s foreign reserves rose to $498.9 billion in April, the highest level in more than a year and an increase of more than $13 billion on the previous month.

The increase is mainly due to the recovery in oil prices which reached approximately $75 a barrel in April.


“It is 90 percent due to rising oil prices,” said Chenevix.

“The remaining 10 percent of responsibility is down to the fact that the Saudi budgetary system is far better managed than it was just three years ago, even though the state is actually spending more money, it is doing so in a more effective and better planned way than before,” he said.

The Kingdom’s reserves also benefited from the government’s international bond issuance of $11 billion in the first half of April.


Abu Dhabi aims to lure start-ups with investment in new technology hub

Updated 24 March 2019
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Abu Dhabi aims to lure start-ups with investment in new technology hub

  • The initiative will help Abu Dhabi reduce reliance on oil
  • Mubadala hopes to attract Chinese and Indian companies

ABU DHABI: Abu Dhabi will commit up to $272 million to support technology start-ups, it said on Sunday, in a dedicated hub as part of efforts to diversify its economy.

US tech giant Microsoft will be a strategic partner, providing technology and cloud services to the businesses that join the hub as the capital of the United Arab Emirates continues its push to reduce reliance on oil revenue.
Abu Dhabi derives about 50 percent of its real gross domestic product and about 90 percent of central government revenue from the hydrocarbon sector, according to ratings agency S&P.
The emirate launched a $13.6 billion stimulus fund, Ghadan 21, in September last year to accelerate economic growth. Ghadan means tomorrow in Arabic. The new initiative, named Hub 71, is linked to Ghadan will also involve the launch of a $136 million fund to invest in start-ups, said Ibrahim Ajami, head of Mubadala Ventures, the technology arm of Mubadala Investment Co.
The goal is to have 100 companies over the next three to five years, Ajami said. “The market opportunities in this region are immense,” he added.
Mubadala, with assets of $225 billion and a big investor in tech companies, will act as the driver of the hub, located in the emirate’s financial district.
Softbank will be active in the hub and support the expansion of companies in which it has invested, Ajami said, adding that Mubadala is also aiming to attract Chinese and Indian companies, among others.
Mubadala which has committed $15 billion to the Softbank Vision Fund, plans to launch a $400 million fund to invest in leading European technology companies.
Incentives mapped out by the government include housing, office space and health insurance as part of the $272 million commitment, Ajami said.
Abu Dhabi will also announce a new research and development initiative on Monday linked to the Ghadan 21 plan, according to an invitation sent to journalists.