Indonesia’s Citilink cabin crew fly high with hijab uniform

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Women flight attendants on Indonesia’s low-cost Citilink airline wear uniforms featuring a headscarf design. (Citilink Indonesia)
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Women flight attendants on Indonesia’s low-cost Citilink airline wear uniforms featuring a headscarf design. (Citilink Indonesia)
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Women flight attendants on Indonesia’s low-cost Citilink airline wear uniforms featuring a headscarf design. (Citilink Indonesia)
Updated 01 June 2018
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Indonesia’s Citilink cabin crew fly high with hijab uniform

  • The new uniform, which comes in dark green and lime green colors, was designed by an Indonesian designer, Luis Vioni.
  • About 185 out of Citilink’s 750 female flight attendants wear headscarves in their daily lives.

JAKARTA: Women flight attendants on Indonesia’s low-cost Citilink airline have been given the option of wearing uniforms featuring a headscarf design.
“We came up with the idea so that female flight attendants could exercise their religious beliefs,” Ranty Astari Rachman, Citilink’s vice president of corporate social responsibility, told Arab News.
About 185 out of Citilink’s 750 female flight attendants wear headscarves in their daily lives, she said.
The new uniform, which comes in dark green and lime green colors, was designed by an Indonesian designer, Luis Vioni, and features a “Gurdo Aji” — a bird creature from Hindu mythology.
Rachman said the hijab uniform would not compromise flight attendants’ ability to provide safety and service for passengers.
Citilink, a low-cost subsidiary of Indonesia’s flag carrier Garuda Indonesia, includes Aceh — the only province in Indonesia with autonomy to impose shariah law — and Jeddah among its routes.
Rachman said that before the uniform was launched, the airline already had a special head covering for female flight attendants on both routes.
Aceh’s local administration announced in January that Muslim female flight attendants must wear headscarves when they fly in and out of the province, and non-Muslim flight attendants must dress modestly.
Aviation analyst Arista Atmadjati said the new uniform was timely since plenty of female flight attendants wore headscarves in their everyday lives.
“This is a good move to anticipate flying to destinations where Islamic culture is strong and modest attire for flight attendants would be preferred,” he said.


Yousra Elsadig brings her modest style to LFW

An image from the show in London. (Frederico Velez)
Updated 21 February 2019
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Yousra Elsadig brings her modest style to LFW

DUBAI: An independent showcase of emerging designers held during London Fashion Week, Fashion Scout once again lived up to its name — scouting out and presenting talented designers from across the globe from Feb. 15-17.

Arab News went along to a showing by a UK-based designer Yousra Elsadig, whose Boutique De Nana collection paid tribute to her former home country, Sudan.

“I am trying to depict the beauty of my homeland. It’s so heart-breaking to see what’s happening in Sudan. I want to dedicate this collection to my country and to put the focus on freedom, justice and peace,” she said.

Elsadig, who was named “Woman of the Year” by Barclays in 2017 and “Designer of The Year 2016 by the Modest Association of London, designs for women who want to dress modestly, but with imagination and style.

“The modest element is very important to me — women can be beautiful, feminine and modest,” she said.

Her designs have a simplicity, charm and quirkiness that comes partly from the use of recycled fabrics, as sustainability is a key message she wants to get across. 

Elsadig is unusual in combining her designer role with a full-time degree in optometry. In fact, the day before her LFW show, she sat an exam and then drove from her home in Wales to London. 

She is also the mother of two young girls, but if that’s a lot to juggle it doesn’t show. She was a bundle of warmth and energy backstage — calmly briefing the models.

Her family left Sudan when she was very young and she grew up in Canada. Her family then left Canada to live in Wales in the UK.

It was in Cardiff that she met her mentor, designer Sarah Valentin, who was teaching community sewing and textile classes with a special focus on recycling and sustainability. Valentin said she is thrilled to see Elsadig achieving such success.

“I saw her potential and creative ideas. It’s incredible that she is showing here at London Fashion Week.  I’m so proud of her,” she said.

As the models moved gracefully through the room, the clothes gave off a sense of confident, graceful and highly individual style — perfect for the modern, modest woman of today.