Animosity toward US ‘drives Philippine president’

Author Jonathan Miller displays his biography of Rodrigo Duterte at a book-signing event on Thursday, May 31, 2018, at the Australian National University in Canberra, Australia. (AP)
Updated 02 June 2018
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Animosity toward US ‘drives Philippine president’

  • Duterte would like the Philippines to be part of new sphere that included China and Russia and abandon the old alliances
  • China’s greatest appeal to the 72-year-old Philippine leader for a realigned relationship was money

MANILA: CANBERRA, Australia: The author of the first biography of Rodrigo Duterte says the maverick Philippine president was gravitating toward China partly because of a personal animosity toward the United States and its criticisms of his human rights record.
Jonathan Miller, Asia correspondent for Britain’s Channel 4 News, spent more than a year interviewing Duterte’s family, Cabinet members, supporters and critics to compile a biography largely in the words of Filipinos. It’s called “Duterte Harry,” a nickname Duterte earned during 22 years as the gun-toting mayor of southern Davao city. It’s also a play on the Clinton Eastward movie title “Dirty Harry.”
The British journalist said Duterte would like the Philippines to be part of new sphere that included China and Russia and abandon the old alliances including with the United States, the country’s former colonial power.
China’s greatest appeal to the 72-year-old Philippine leader for a realigned relationship was money, Miller said.
“The Chinese have actually promised a lot of investment and although Duterte in the past has not been known for his infrastructure work, there are few countries in Southeast Asia that are in more need of investment and infrastructure than the Philippines — they need rail and road transport desperately,” Miller told The Associated Press in Canberra during a book signing.
“He’s looking for a lot of Chinese money in that, but he’s also doing it to punish the US and he’s got a personal chip on his shoulder over the United States, which has criticized him for his human rights abuses,” Miller said.
“He values China because they don’t criticize his human rights stuff,” he added.
Many Filipinos are unsettled by Duterte moving away from the United States and closer to China, which aggressively contests the Philippines’ territorial claims in the South China Sea.
“The move toward China alarms a lot of Filipinos who love America more than any other country in the world,” Miller said.
Duterte’s gripes with the United States include being refused a visa, apparently because of State Department alarm at death squads that operated in Davao when he was mayor, Miller said.
The International Criminal Court is conducting a preliminary probe into extrajudicial killings during Duterte’s signature war-on-drugs policy despite the president withdrawing his country from the court’s jurisdiction. A Filipino lawyer has complained that the anti-drugs campaign could amount to crimes against humanity.
Miller suspects the slayings of suspected drug users and pushers “represents the largest loss of life in Southeast Asia since Pol Pot,” the leader of the genocidal Khmer Rouge regime that killed millions in Cambodia in the late 1970s.
More than 4,000 mostly urban poor suspects have been killed by police — a staggering death toll officials blame on the suspects fighting back. Human rights watchdogs have cited much higher numbers of fatalities, which the government disputes.
Duterte denies condoning summary killings and has lashed out at critics, including former President Barack Obama, Western governments and UN human rights officials who have raised alarm over the killings.
Miller’s book notes that Duterte has publicly derided Obama, Pope Francis and the author with a favored “son of a whore” insult, while declaring his approval for President Donald Trump.
In Canberra, Miller described Duterte as an admitted liar, thin-skinned, narcissistic, vengeful, angry and deeply misogynistic.
The book cites a 1998 psychologist’s report used by Duterte’s former wife in a marriage annulment court application that described Duterte as having a narcissistic personality disorder with aggressive features.
The diagnosis was drawn from the wife’s testimony. His daughter Sara Duterte-Carpio told the author that her father had been chivalrous in not contesting the report and allowing the marriage to end in a country does not recognize divorce.
Miller approached Duterte to be interviewed for the biography. Duterte referred Miller to staff to set an appointment, but staff never did.
Duterte’s top aide summoned the US ambassador in February to discuss a global threat assessment by American intelligence agencies that mentioned the Philippine leader along with dangers facing democracy in Cambodia, Myanmar and Thailand.
The US report said “autocratic tendencies” are expected to deepen in some governments in Southeast Asia and mentioned that Duterte has suggested he could suspend the constitution, declare a “revolutionary government” and impose nationwide martial law.
Duterte’s foreign policy critics argue his administration has not done enough to defend his country’s sovereignty in the South China Sea and argue it has been far too soft on China.
The Russian navy has visited Manila three times since Duterte vowed to diversify the country’s ties away from the United States and toward China and Russia. Duterte supports Russian President Vladimir Putin.


Wanted Sri Lanka radical Hashim killed in hotel attack

Updated 10 min 18 sec ago
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Wanted Sri Lanka radical Hashim killed in hotel attack

  • Hashim appeared in a video released by the Daesh group after they claimed the bombings
  • Inspector General of Police Pujith Jayasundara resigned over failures that led to the deadly Easter bomb attacks

COLOMBO: An extremist believed to have played a key role in Sri Lanka’s deadly Easter bombings died in an attack on a Colombo hotel, the country’s president confirmed Friday.
“What intelligence agencies have told me is that Zahran was killed during the Shangri-La attack,” President Maithripala Sirisena told reporters, referring to Zahran Hashim, leader of a local extremist group.
Hashim appeared in a video released by the Daesh group after they claimed the bombings, but his whereabouts after the blasts was not immediately clear.
Sirisena did not immediately clarify what Hashim’s role was in the attack on the Shangri-La, one of six bomb blasts that killed over 250 people on Sunday.

Meanwhile, Sri Lanka’s top police official, Inspector General of Police Pujith Jayasundara, has resigned over failures that led to the deadly Easter bomb attacks, the country’s president said Friday.
“The IGP has resigned. He has sent his resignation to the acting defense secretary. I’ll nominate a new IGP soon,” President Maithripala Sirisena told reporters.
Sirisena’s nominee has to be confirmed by a constitutional council.
The resignation comes after the country’s top defense ministry official, defense secretary Hemasiri Fernando resigned on Thursday.

Sirisena also said police are looking for 140 people believed to have links with the Daesh group over the attacks.
Sirisena told reporters some Sri Lankan youths had been involved with the extremist group since 2013, and that top defense and police chiefs had not shared information with him about the impending attacks.
He also blamed Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe’s government for weakening the intelligence system by focusing on the prosecution of military officers over alleged war crimes during a decade-long civil war with Tamil separatists.