Netanyahu: Syria regime ‘no longer immune’ from retaliation

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu warned that Syria was not immune from retaliation (AFP/File)
Updated 07 June 2018
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Netanyahu: Syria regime ‘no longer immune’ from retaliation

  • Israel has been pledging for months to prevent its main enemy Iran from entrenching itself militarily in Syria
  • Last month, Israel launched a large-scale attack on what it said were Iranian targets in Syria

LONDON: Syrian President Bashar Assad’s regime is “no longer immune” from retaliation, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu warned during a visit to London on Thursday.
“He is no longer immune, his regime is no longer immune. If he fires at us, we will destroy his forces,” Netanyahu said, speaking at an event organized by the Policy Exchange think tank.
“I think there is a new calculus that has to take place and Syria has to understand that Israel will not tolerate the Iranian military entrenchment in Syria against Israel,” he said.
“The consequences are not merely to the Iranian forces there but to the Assad regime as well,” he said, adding: “I think it’s something that he should consider very seriously.”
Israel has been pledging for months to prevent its main enemy Iran from entrenching itself militarily in Syria, where Tehran is backing Assad’s government.
Last month, Israel launched a large-scale attack on what it said were Iranian targets in Syria, raising fears of a major confrontation.
Those strikes followed a barrage of rockets that Israel said were fired toward its forces in the occupied Golan Heights by Iran from Syria.
Even before that, Israel had been blamed for a series of recent strikes inside Syria that killed Iranians, though it has not acknowledged them.


Egypt court sentences two monks to death over bishop killing

Updated 23 February 2019
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Egypt court sentences two monks to death over bishop killing

  • Authorities blamed the killing on unspecified ‘differences’ between the two monks and the bishop
  • Coptic Christians make up about 10 percent of Egypt’s predominantly Sunni Muslim population of 100 million

CAIRO: An Egyptian court on Saturday sentenced two monks to death over the murder of a bishop, a judicial source said, in a case that shocked the Middle East’s largest Christian community.
Coptic Bishop Epiphanius was found dead with a head wound in July at the Saint Macarius monastery in the plains of Wadi Al-Natrun, northwest of Cairo.
Prosecutors said one of the monks Isaiah confessed to striking the abbot with a metal bar as the second monk Philotheos kept watch.
The authorities blamed the killing on unspecified “differences” between the two monks, one of whom was later defrocked, and the bishop.
The sentence against the two monks was referred to Egypt’s Grand Mufti.
The country’s top theological authority is required by law to give its legally non-binding opinion in cases of capital punishment.
The defendants can appeal the verdict after the Mufti gives an opinion and the ruling is officially issued on April 24.
In the wake of the bishop’s killing, Egypt’s Coptic Church placed a one-year moratorium on accepting new monks.
It also banned monks from social media, tightened financial controls and refocused attention on spiritual life.
Coptic Christians make up about 10 percent of Egypt’s predominantly Sunni Muslim population of 100 million.
The country’s vast desert is home to some of Christianity’s most ancient monasteries.