Saudi investors keen on real estate and looking abroad

Dubai Marina by night: The UAE is the preferred market for 28 percent of GCC investors. (AFP)
Updated 20 June 2018
0

Saudi investors keen on real estate and looking abroad

  • Many Saudis are looking outside the Kingdom for opportunities in the property market, according to a new survey of investment patterns among residents.
  • Some 85 percent of Saudi residents have invested in property at some stage, but over half of respondents are considering putting their cash into international real estate.

DUBAI: Most investors in Saudi Arabia are committed to real estate as their main investment vehicle, but many are looking outside the Kingdom for opportunities in the property market, according to a new survey of investment patterns among residents.

Some 85 percent of Saudi residents have invested in property at some stage, but over half of respondents are considering putting their cash into international real estate, the survey, by market research firm YouGov on behalf of British property developer Select Property Group, reveals.

“Investor confidence is only further evidenced by the frequency in which investments are being made. The results found that almost a quarter (23 percent) of investors based in Saudi Arabia look to make a new investment at least every three months.

“Respondents were asked to consider their previous and potential future investments in bonds, stocks and real estate – both domestically and internationally – as well as mutual funds, bank products, gold and precious metals, cryptocurrency and fine art. Across every category, respondents demonstrated a desire to increase their level of investment in the coming years,” the report said.

 

Despite cryptocurrency being in its relative infancy as an asset, 5 percent of respondents based in Saudi Arabia declared they have already spent over $500,000 in the digital currency, though investment levels collectively still trail far behind more traditional asset classes, such as real estate.

The Saudi Arabian Monetary Authority has warned of the “risky and speculative” nature of crypto-currencies like Bitcoin, while welcoming blockchain as an innovative financial technology.

“The results show that investors in this region are highly motivated and it’s interesting to see the mix of key investment choices among the varying demographics. It’s promising to see that Saudi Arabia residents are also inclined to make regular investments, constantly keeping an eye on the market and looking to capitalize on the latest opportunities,” said Adam Price, managing director at Select Property Group.

Investors in Saudi Arabia and the UAE accounted for the highest proportion of the “very knowledgeable” category in the survey.

In the wider Gulf, most investors looking at overseas property were interested in residential real estate (44 percent) with 27 percent eyeing commercial property.

The UAE is the preferred market for 28 percent of GCC investors, with 16 percent interested in the US and 8 percent naming the UK as their preferred destination. Some 11 percent looked favorably on Turkish real estate.

An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated that the Select Property Group survey found that 1 percent of GCC property investors said the UK was their preferred market. The correct figure is 8 percent. This has been amended in the above text.

FASTFACTS

The Saudi Arabian Monetary Authority has warned investors of the “risky and speculative” nature of crypto-currencies such as Bitcoin.


Relief for UK buyers as consumer prices drop more than expected

Updated 17 October 2018
0

Relief for UK buyers as consumer prices drop more than expected

  • Consumer prices rose at an annual rate of 2.4 percent, more than reversing August’s jump to a six-month high of 2.7 percent
  • The figures are likely to reassure Bank of England officials

LONDON: British inflation fell more than expected in September to a three-month low, offering some relief to consumers who have been squeezed financially since the Brexit vote.
Consumer prices rose at an annual rate of 2.4 percent, more than reversing August’s jump to a six-month high of 2.7 percent, the Office for National Statistics said.
That was well below the consensus forecast of 2.6 percent in a Reuters poll of economists.
Sterling fell against the dollar and euro while British government bond prices rose.
The figures are likely to reassure Bank of England officials who forecast in August that inflation would average around 2.5 percent over the July-September quarter.
“Coupled with the gradual up-tick in wages, the slowing rise in prices will deliver a boost to consumers’ real take-home pay packets, which will also be welcome news for retailers,” said Tej Parikh, senior economist at the Institute of Directors.
“The Bank of England will be unruffled by this week’s data releases, and remains unlikely to budge on interest rates as it continues to monitor the impact of Brexit developments.” The BoE expects it will need to raise interest rates gradually in response to rising wages, assuming Britain manages to strike a deal with the European Union to smooth its exit from the bloc.
On Tuesday, the ONS said the basic wages of workers had risen at their fastest pace in nearly a decade over the summer months.
But wage growth of 3.1 percent remains meagre by historical standards when adjusted for inflation.
The BoE expects inflation to drift down but stay just above its 2 percent target in two years’ time as it gradually raises borrowing costs.
Consumer price inflation hit a five-year high of 3.1 percent in November, when the inflationary effect of the pound’s tumble after the Brexit vote in June 2016 reached its peak.
The ONS said food prices, particularly of meat and chocolate, represented the biggest drag on September’s inflation rate.
Ferry prices dropped from a “surprisingly high” summer peak.
Still, there could be more short-term pressure in the pipeline for consumer prices.
For manufacturers, the cost of raw materials — many of them imported — was 10.3 percent higher than in September 2017, up from a revised 9.4 percent in August.
That was a bigger jump than any economist had forecast in the Reuters poll, which anticipated a rise of 9.2 percent.
Manufacturers increased the prices they charged by 3.1 percent compared with 2.9 percent in August, again stronger than all forecasts in the poll, which had pointed to a 2.9 percent increase.
The ONS said house prices in August rose by an annual 3.2 percent across the UK as a whole, the smallest rise since August 2013 and compared with a 3.4 percent increase in July.
Prices in London alone slipped 0.2 percent.