History under microscope at Makkah’s Golden Age Treasures exhibition

The exhibition captures Islamic heritage in a new and different way. (AN photo)
Updated 08 June 2018
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History under microscope at Makkah’s Golden Age Treasures exhibition

  • The exhibition, which runs until June 13, has also attracted university students who researched famous Islamic figures by studying the history and work of each figure.
  • The event seeks to inspire visitors and remind them of the importance of building a future based on science, tolerance and social participation.

MAKKAH: The Golden Age Treasures exhibition in Makkah has inspired dozens of young Saudi men and women to portray Muslim scientists of the past at the event.

The young men and women were selected and intensively trained to impersonate figures who influenced the world through their work and discoveries.

The exhibition, which runs until June 13, has also attracted university students who researched famous Islamic figures by studying the history and work of each figure.

Visitors to the exhibition are all welcomed by scientists of the Islamic Golden Age, played by Saudi youths wearing consumes inspired by the era.

After passing auditions, the youths were trained for several days to impersonate the Muslim scientists — and  managed to attract the attention of everyone visiting the exhibition.

They greeted visitors of all ages; welcoming them and encouraging them to learn more about the figures  they were portraying.

The exhibition, supported and supervised by the General Entertainment Authority (GEA), captured Islamic heritage in a new and innovative  way.

The cultural and educational event aims to promote pride in the heritage of Islamic civilization and remind people of its achievements, which have inspired the world through its science and knowledge since the early days in Makkah more than 1,000 years ago.

The event seeks to inspire visitors and remind them of the importance of building a future based on science, tolerance and social participation.

The managing director of the organizing company, Zaki Hassanein, said: “The purpose of the exhibition is to introduce visitors to the golden era of Islamic civilization and the leading role of creative men and women in improving their communities, in addition to promoting pride in the 'knowledge treasures' produced by their civilization and inspiring visitors to play a leading role in their modern societies.

“The exhibition also aims to provide the new generation with the opportunity to learn more about their history and heritage and be proud of pioneers and heroes in an interactive, educational manner that preserves their society’s values and tradition.”

Hassanein said that the exhibition is suitable for all age groups and for all Makkah residents and visitors.

“It presents 1,000 inventions and attracts visitors in different ways to provide them with information through interactive shows, films, live shows, books, digital content, and workshops,” he added.


Opening the door to Middle Eastern designers at Dubai Design Week

Updated 28 min 39 sec ago
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Opening the door to Middle Eastern designers at Dubai Design Week

  • This year, five pavilions from Amman, Beirut, Dubai, the Eastern Provinces of KSA and Kuwait City are showing off
  • The Abwab exhibit is just one thought-provoking, Instagram-worthy part of Dubai Design Week

DUBAI: Named after the Arabic word for “doors,” Abwab is an annual exhibition at Dubai Design Week, a creative fair that runs until Nov. 17.

This year, five pavilions from Amman, Beirut, Dubai, the Eastern Provinces of KSA and Kuwait City are showing off their artistic innovations in Dubai Design District, where the event is based.

Two designers were invited from each place to collaborate and produce works related to the theme “Between the Lines.”

The creations are housed in five pavilions at the heart of Dubai Design District, made up of red twigs and newspaper pulp and designed by the firm Architecture + Other Things.

Visitors crowded around the pavilions at the opening of the fair on Tuesday and explored the five spaces with their unique, sometimes perplexing, offerings.

Amman‘s pavilion at the Abwab exhibit is called “Duwar,” roundabout in Arabic, and is described as a representation of the cycle between chaos and order. The exhibit is a walk-through piece featuring moving images on boards suspended from the low ceiling of the circular space. Visitors are encouraged to walk through the dark circular corridor and take in the constantly flashing imagery above them in the piece that was created by multidisciplinary designer Hashem Joucka and architect Basel Naouri.

Beirut’s contribution to the Abwab exhibit is called “Beirut Fillers” and features a series of suspended words in a constructed sensorial environment, complete with audio recordings of the words “euhhh,” “halla2,” “enno” and “fa,” all of which are linguistic fillers commonly heard in Beiruti conversation.  

For its part, the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia is showcasing a fascinating piece of work called “The Sound of the East Coast” that pays homage to the tradition of pearl diving in the area with shaking, jelly-like bowls. The installation even features audio recordings of the traditional song “El Yamal,” often chanted to keep the divers motivated.

While Kuwait City’s offering, called “Desert Cast,” uses locally sourced materials and production methods to explore the idea of identity in the country, Dubai’s piece at the exhibit is called “Thulathi: Threefold” and is marked by a protruding triangular section that breaks the natural form of the rounded pavilion. Each corner of the triangle opens slightly through apertures, revealing video projections and silhouette cutouts.

The Abwab exhibit is just one thought-provoking, Instagram-worthy part of Dubai Design Week, an event that boasts workshops, exhibits and a trade fair.