History under microscope at Makkah’s Golden Age Treasures exhibition

The exhibition captures Islamic heritage in a new and different way. (AN photo)
Updated 08 June 2018
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History under microscope at Makkah’s Golden Age Treasures exhibition

  • The exhibition, which runs until June 13, has also attracted university students who researched famous Islamic figures by studying the history and work of each figure.
  • The event seeks to inspire visitors and remind them of the importance of building a future based on science, tolerance and social participation.

MAKKAH: The Golden Age Treasures exhibition in Makkah has inspired dozens of young Saudi men and women to portray Muslim scientists of the past at the event.

The young men and women were selected and intensively trained to impersonate figures who influenced the world through their work and discoveries.

The exhibition, which runs until June 13, has also attracted university students who researched famous Islamic figures by studying the history and work of each figure.

Visitors to the exhibition are all welcomed by scientists of the Islamic Golden Age, played by Saudi youths wearing consumes inspired by the era.

After passing auditions, the youths were trained for several days to impersonate the Muslim scientists — and  managed to attract the attention of everyone visiting the exhibition.

They greeted visitors of all ages; welcoming them and encouraging them to learn more about the figures  they were portraying.

The exhibition, supported and supervised by the General Entertainment Authority (GEA), captured Islamic heritage in a new and innovative  way.

The cultural and educational event aims to promote pride in the heritage of Islamic civilization and remind people of its achievements, which have inspired the world through its science and knowledge since the early days in Makkah more than 1,000 years ago.

The event seeks to inspire visitors and remind them of the importance of building a future based on science, tolerance and social participation.

The managing director of the organizing company, Zaki Hassanein, said: “The purpose of the exhibition is to introduce visitors to the golden era of Islamic civilization and the leading role of creative men and women in improving their communities, in addition to promoting pride in the 'knowledge treasures' produced by their civilization and inspiring visitors to play a leading role in their modern societies.

“The exhibition also aims to provide the new generation with the opportunity to learn more about their history and heritage and be proud of pioneers and heroes in an interactive, educational manner that preserves their society’s values and tradition.”

Hassanein said that the exhibition is suitable for all age groups and for all Makkah residents and visitors.

“It presents 1,000 inventions and attracts visitors in different ways to provide them with information through interactive shows, films, live shows, books, digital content, and workshops,” he added.


Bong d’Or: Korean director wins Cannes’ top prize

Updated 25 May 2019
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Bong d’Or: Korean director wins Cannes’ top prize

  • French-Senegalese director Mati Diop’s “Atlantics" wins festival’s second place award, the Grand Prize
  • Belgian brothers Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne shared the best director for “Young Ahmed”

CANNES, France: South Korean director Bong Joon-ho’s social satire “Parasite,” about a poor family of hustlers who find jobs with a wealthy family, won the Cannes Film Festival’s top award, the Palme d’Or, on Saturday.
The win for “Parasite” marks the first Korean film to ever win the Palme. In the festival’s closing ceremony, jury president Alejandro Inarritu said the choice had been “unanimous” for the nine-person jury.
The genre-mixing film had been celebrated as arguably the most critically acclaimed film at Cannes this year and the best yet from the 49-year-old director of “Snowpiercer” and “Okja.”
It was the second straight Palme victory for an Asian director. Last year, the award went to Japanese filmmaker Hirokazu Kore-eda’s “Shoplifters.”
Two years ago, Bong was in Cannes’ competition with “Okja,” a movie distributed in North America by Netflix. After it and Noah Baumbach’s “The Meyerowitz Stories” — another Netflix release — premiered in Cannes, the festival ruled that all films in competition needed French theatrical distribution. Netflix has since withdrawn from the festival on the French Riveira.
The festival’s second place award, the Grand Prize, went to French-Senegalese director Mati Diop’s “Atlantics.” Diop was the first black female director in competition at Cannes.
Belgian brothers Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne shared the best director for “Young Ahmed.”
Best actor went to Antonio Banderas for Pedro Almodovar’s “Pain and Glory,” while best actress was won by British actress Emily Beecham for “Little Joe.”
Although few quibbled with the choice of Bong, some had expected Cannes to make history by giving the Palme to a female filmmaker for just the second time.
Celine Sciamma’s period romance “Portrait of a Lady on Fire” was the Palme pick for many critics this year, but it ended up with best screenplay.
In the festival’s 72-year history, only Jane Champion has won the prize in 1993, and she tied with Chen Kaige’s “Farewell My Concubine.”