Unimpressive Germany beat Saudi Arabia 2-1 in World Cup warmup

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Saudi Arabia's foward Mohammad Al-Sahlawi missed a penalty. (AFP)
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Saudi Arabia's midfielder Taisir Al-Jassim pounced on a penalty save to score. (AFP)
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The Green Falcons would be pleased by a competitive game against the world champions Germany. (AP)
Updated 09 June 2018

Unimpressive Germany beat Saudi Arabia 2-1 in World Cup warmup

  • Saudi Arabia goalkeeper Abdullah Al-Mayouf was impressive throughout
  • Joachim Loew’s side again failed to shine

LEVERKUSEN, Germany: Defending World Cup champion Germany defeated Saudi Arabia 2-1 on Friday for a timely but unimpressive win one week before its title defense begins in Russia.

Having failed to win any of its previous five friendly games since wrapping up qualification with a perfect 10 wins from 10 matches, Germany was keen to deliver a statement four days before the side leaves for its tournament base in Moscow, especially after last Saturday’s lackluster 2-1 defeat to Austria.

But Joachim Loew’s side again failed to shine and had to rely on Mats Hummels denying Mohammad Al-Sahlawi an injury-time equalizer.

Loew started his strongest available side. Mesut Ozil, who is laboring with a knee injury, was left out with Julian Draxler of Paris Saint-Germain taking the Arsenal midfielder’s place.

Timo Werner fired the home side into an early lead after Marco Reus cut the ball back. It was one-way play thereafter, though the visitors did create some chances as the home side relaxed before the break.

Just when it seemed there might be an equalizer, Werner crossed for Omar Hawsawi to turn the ball into his own net under pressure from Thomas Mueller.

Saudi Arabia goalkeeper Abdullah Al-Mayouf, who was impressive throughout, denied Gundogan just minutes after he came on.

Marc-Andre ter Stegen, who came on for Manuel Neuer at the break, saved a late penalty from Al-Sahlawi but Taisir Al-Jassim followed up on the rebound. The result arguably does more for Saudi Arabia’s hopes than Germany.


Dubai uses extreme cold cryotherapy to treat racehorses in world first

Updated 21 August 2019

Dubai uses extreme cold cryotherapy to treat racehorses in world first

  • Cryotherapy, which surrounds the body in a mist as cold as -140°C, has been used for decades on athletes to aid recovery and in medicine
  • A Dubai-based company, Revive Cryotherapy, says it is now offering the first whole body cryotherapy chamber for horses

DUBAI: In the searing summer heat of Dubai, some of the world’s top racehorses are being swathed in freezing nitrogen mist to boost their performance.
Cryotherapy, which surrounds the body in a mist as cold as -140°C, has been used for decades on athletes to aid recovery and in medicine. A Dubai-based company, Revive Cryotherapy, says it is now offering the first whole body cryotherapy chamber for horses.
“As far as recovery goes we are learning, but it is positive so far,” said Satish Seemar, head trainer at Zabeel Racing Stables which trains about 125 horses.
“The horses start hopping quicker after their hard work and racing than without cryotherapy,” he added.
Dubai, part of the United Arab Emirates, is known for its connections to elite horse racing. Its ruler, Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al-Maktoum, is an avid sponsor, owner and rider of horses. The emirate gives out multi-million dollar prizes at prestigious competitions.
“Horse racing is a big business with prizes worth millions of dollars. With cryotherapy we have seen that you can train harder, recover quicker and you can race more often,” said Luka Jurkovic, general manager of Revive Cryotherapy.
The company also offers the technology to humans and dogs and is thinking of expanding into the world of camel racing.
“We will have to scale it up a bit as camels are obviously bigger,” Jurkovic said.
Revive, which has two other bespoke horse cryotherapy cabins in Dubai, finished the testing phase in April and is now using it daily on horses at Zabeel Stables, a lush green space in the heart of Dubai’s high-rise financial district.
The horses are gradually introduced to the cabin, which fits snugly around their bodies leaving their heads and necks free, and treated with the swirling cold mist. After a first few familiarization sessions, they undergo a full treatment which lasts around seven minutes and cools their skin to about 3-5 degrees.
The cabin doors are not locked allowing horses to escape if they panic.
Cryotherapy is thought to help inflammation and tissue damage, and to help athletes — and horses — recover faster after exercise.