Iraqi flown back to Germany after ‘confessing’ teen’s murder: reports

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Police officers of a special unit escort Iraqi asylum seeker Ali Bashar, who is suspected of having killed a German teenage girl, from a helicopter to the police headquarters in Wiesbaden, western Germany, after he was flown back from Irbil to Germany on June 9, 2018. The 20-year-old man was brought back to Germany after admitting raping and murdering 14-year-old Susanna Maria Feldman, Iraqi Kurdish officials and German media reports said. (AFP)
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A cross with a sign reading 'Susanna, 14 year-old, victim of tolerance' is placed among flowers and candles at a makeshift memorial at the site where 14-year-old Susanna Maria Feldman has been allegedly raped and murdered by an Iraqi asylum seeker. (AFP)
Updated 10 June 2018
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Iraqi flown back to Germany after ‘confessing’ teen’s murder: reports

  • Ali Bashar, 20, is believed to have strangled 14-year-old Susanna Maria Feldman after raping her in the German city of Wiesbaden.
  • He was detained early Friday in northern Iraq following an outcry in Germany after police hunting the fugitive admitted he had fled with his family.

FRANKFURT: A failed Iraqi asylum seeker arrived by plane back in Germany on Saturday after admitting raping and murdering a teenage girl, Iraqi Kurdish officials and German media reports said.
“I am delighted the suspect sought by justice is back in Germany,” said Interior Minister Horst Seehofer in a statement, adding he hoped Ali Bashar, 20, would now “rapidly” face trial.
Bashar is alleged to have strangled 14-year-old Susanna Maria Feldman after raping her in the German city of Wiesbaden.
He was detained in northern Iraq on Friday following an outcry in Germany after police hunting the fugitive admitted he had fled with his family.
Despite the absence of a formal extradition treaty between Iraq and Germany, he was put on a Lufthansa flight to Germany from the Kurdish regional capital Irbil, German media reports said.
He was expected to face a remand hearing after landing in Frankfurt, the reports said.
The case has put renewed pressure on Chancellor Angela Merkel’s government over the decision to open Germany’s borders at the height of Europe’s refugee crisis in 2015, resulting in the arrival of more than a million asylum seekers.
Demonstrators held a minute’s silence in cities across Germany on Saturday, notably in the teenager’s hometown of Mainz.
On Friday, a senior official in the autonomous Kurdistan region had told AFP that authorities were working to transfer Bashar quickly back to Germany to face trial.
“During interrogation following his arrest, the young man originally from Kurdistan confessed to killing the German girl,” said Tariq Ahmad, police chief for the Dohuk province of Iraqi Kurdistan.
“He said that the two of them were friends but that they had a dispute, and that he killed her when the girl threatened to call the police,” Ahmad said.
Bashar arrived in Germany in 2015 along with his parents and five siblings.
He should have been deported after his request for asylum was rejected in December 2016, but he obtained a temporary residence permit pending his appeal.
During this time, he got into trouble with the police on several occasions, including for fights, alleged robbery and possession of an illegal switchblade.
He was also among the suspects for the sexual assault of an 11-year-old girl living in the same refugee shelter.
Seehofer said Bashar’s return was but “small consolation” for the victim’s parents who he said were in his thoughts.
“For the state of our society it is important these crimes be cleared up and that the suspects be brought to justice,” he added.


Australian Daesh orphans rescued from Syria camp

Updated 18 min 20 sec ago
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Australian Daesh orphans rescued from Syria camp

  • The children are believed to be aged between two and 17 and were living in a camp in northern Syria
  • Several European countries, including France and Belgium, have repatriated children from Syria in recent months

SYDNEY: Eight orphans of Australian Daesh fighters have been spirited out of a camp in Syria, Prime Minister Scott Morrison said Monday, in an apparent U-turn.
The children and grandchildren of two notorious militants are now in the care of Australian officials, he said in a statement.
The children are believed to be aged between two and 17 and were living in a camp in northern Syria — making consular access all but impossible.
Morrison previously indicated his government would only help citizens if they approached an embassy or consulate but appeared to have had a change of heart.
“The fact that parents put their children into harm’s way by taking them into a war zone was a despicable act,” Morrison said in a statement.
“However, children should not be punished for the crimes of their parents.”
The group includes three surviving children and two grandchildren of Sydney-born Khaled Sharrouf — who came to prominence after posting a photo of one of his sons holding the head of a Syrian soldier.
There are also three children of Yasin Rizvic who traveled from Australia to Syria with his wife.
Both Daesh fighters are presumed dead.
Morrison did not name the children or elaborate on how they were removed, but confirmed they were “repatriated from the conflict zone into the care of Australian government officials.”
The Australian Broadcasting Corporation reported that the children had been moved to a country neighboring Syria.
Their case had gained widespread attention after the grandmother of the Sharrouf children — 17-year-old heavily pregnant Zaynab, her younger sister Hoda, their eight-year-old brother Hamzeh, and Zaynab’s two young children Ayesha, three, and Fatima, two — had pleaded with Canberra to bring them home.
Grandmother Karen Nettleton even traveled to the camp earlier this year to meet them but was rebuffed by authorities, and Morrison said he did not want to put Australian lives at risk.
The prime minister on Monday repeated his concerns, adding that “repatriating these children was not a decision the Australian government made lightly.”
“Australia’s national security and the safety of our people and personnel have always been our most important considerations in this matter,” he said.
The fate of foreign fighters and their families has become a significant problem for governments as the conflict against Daesh draws to a close.
Several European countries, including France and Belgium, have repatriated children from Syria in recent months.