Saudi Arabia bans poultry imports from Nepal over bird flu

An auction assistant holds aloft a bird for sale during the York Auction Centre's Christmas Poultry Auction of dressed poultry in York, northern England, in this file photo taken on December 21, 2017. (AFP)
Updated 11 June 2018
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Saudi Arabia bans poultry imports from Nepal over bird flu

  • Bird flu strains have hit poultry flocks in a number of countries across the world in recent years
  • H5N8 is highly pathogenic to birds (high death rates) and was first discovered in Ireland in 1983

JEDDAH: Saudi Arabia’s Environment Ministry has imposed a ban on the import of live birds, incubated eggs and chicks from Nepal as a precaution against high-risk bird influenza, the Saudi Press Agency reported on Saturday.
Dr. Sanad Al-Harbi, Director General of Livestock Risks Evaluation Department at the ministry, said the ban has been imposed following reports about an outbreak of bird flu in Nepal.
He said it is a step taken in the interest of the public and to prevent the spread of the disease in the Kingdom.
The director general of the Quarantine General Department, Dr. Osama Al-Saleh, said the ban order has been circulated over all quarantines of the Kingdom. Bird flu strains have hit poultry flocks in a number of countries across the world in recent years, with some types of the disease also causing human infections and deaths.
H5N8 is highly pathogenic to birds (high death rates) and was first discovered in Ireland in 1983. Since then it has been reported in numerous locations around the world. AN Jeddah


Majlis culture brings a little Saudi warmth to freezing Davos

At a five-star hotel in Davos, the Saudi Arabia General Investment Authority has sponsored a prominent display proclaiming ‘The future-forward economy — Invest Saudi.’ (AN photo)
Updated 23 January 2019
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Majlis culture brings a little Saudi warmth to freezing Davos

  • The Misk Pavilion is one of the many signs of the Kingdom’s enthusiastic involvement in the world’s biggest gathering of political, business and thought leaders

DAVOS: From the sub-zero temperatures of the icy Davos Promenade you are ushered through a glass door into the warmth of a desert majlis, with works by young Saudi artists on the walls and traditional Arabian delicacies being served. It is quite a culture shock.

The Davos majlis is the work of the Misk Global Forum (MGF), the international arm of the organization founded by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman to promote youth empowerment. 

The Misk Pavilion is one of the many signs of the Kingdom’s enthusiastic involvement in the world’s biggest gathering of political, business and thought leaders.

“The Kingdom’s participation in WEF 2019 highlights its role in developing the regional and global economy, and reflects the nation’s continuing ambition for sustainable development,” said Bader Al-Asaker, head of the crown prince’s private office and chairman of the Misk Initiatives Center. 

The Saudi delegation’s HQ overlooks the main congress hall, inside the Davos security cordon. 

At a nearby five-star hotel, the Saudi Arabia General Investment Authority has sponsored a prominent display proclaiming: “The future-forward economy — Invest Saudi.” 

This is the second year Misk has been prominent at Davos. As well as the majlis, its pavilion offers visitors the chance to immerse themselves in modern Saudi art via a virtual reality tour of the work of four young artists.

Misk is organizing daily events there, building up to a power breakfast with leading executives on Friday on the theme of youth empowerment.

“In an age of profound economic disruption, we regard young people as the problem-solvers, not a problem to be solved,” said MGF executive manager Shaima Hamidaddin.

“We’re holding interactive discussions on how to empower young people to be the architects of the future economy, not the tenants of it.”