My Ramadan with MMA fighter Ahmed Amir: Experiencing the Holy Month in Kuwait

Ahmed Amir is an Egyptian mixed martial artist based in Kuwait. (Arab News)
Updated 11 June 2018
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My Ramadan with MMA fighter Ahmed Amir: Experiencing the Holy Month in Kuwait

  • Ahmed Amir (aka “The Butcher”) is an Egyptian mixed martial artist
  • He believes that it does not matter where you are during Ramadan so long as you are with your family

Ahmed Amir (aka “The Butcher”) is an Egyptian mixed martial artist who, when not fighting in ‘Brave’ events around the world, is based in Salmiya, Kuwait, with his wife and one-year-old daughter. Amir, whose fight record stands at 8-2-0, has lived in Kuwait since 2012 and believes that it does not matter where you are during Ramadan so long as you are with your family. He also works as a coach in a local gym.

Read on to experience Ramadan in the Gulf city in his own words...

As an MMA practitioner with a fight in the pipeline for later this year, the holy month of Ramadan poses some unique challenges. I mean, how can you train at high intensity while fasting and without drinking water? Some people would say it is impossible, but it is not. I am fasting for God and nobody else, so anything is possible.

I train twice a day and at the same intensity as ever, but for a shorter period — maybe 30-45 minutes instead of two hours. It’s very tiring, but I do the first session directly before iftar so I can rehydrate afterwards. In the evenings, I work at the gym from 9.30 p.m. until 2 a.m. and squeeze another training session in between classes. That way, I can drink water throughout. You see, with God there is always a way.

For me, that is what Ramadan is all about. It is the most special month of the year and offers a chance for self-reflection and to become closer to God. It is very hot in Kuwait, so with that and the need to continue my training it is hard, but it only teaches us how to be more patient. It is like when I have a meeting with some non-Muslims — they often do not eat in front of me out of respect, but I always say they can if they want. It makes no difference to me.

The Holy Month is also a chance to spend valuable time with family. I am fortunate in that my parents and three of my four brothers live nearby so I am able to enjoy iftar with them, chat a little, drink a fruit juice or coffee and sometimes video-call my other brother and his daughter in Egypt. I am trying to drop some kilos before my next fight, so when I hear the azan I tend to just rehydrate with water or milk with tamarind and eat a salad. Only after an hour or so do I eat the meat or seafood. I don’t like to eat too much too quickly.

Ramadan hasn’t changed much in the six years I have been in Salmiya. The weather has got warmer, but that’s all. There a few community events in the evenings with Arabic music and sweets, but because I am working at night, I am not able to go. I would never complain though, because the gym is my favorite place. I’m a fighter and coach and this is my life and career. I love it. The time spent in the gym and those few hours I have with my family are the best.

Fact Box
Name: Ahmed Amir
Age: 27
Profession: Mixed Martial Artist
Earliest fajr this year: 03:10
Latest maghrib this year: 18:49
Fasting tip: Ask yourself why you are fasting. If it is for the right reasons, then it won’t be hard.
Favorite restaurant for Iftar: I prefer to eat in the house with my family.
Best Ramadan dish: Sweets! Kanafeh and baclava are my favorites.
Most-watched Ramadan show: I don’t have time to watch TV.


Opening the door to Middle Eastern designers at Dubai Design Week

Updated 14 November 2018
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Opening the door to Middle Eastern designers at Dubai Design Week

  • This year, five pavilions from Amman, Beirut, Dubai, the Eastern Provinces of KSA and Kuwait City are showing off
  • The Abwab exhibit is just one thought-provoking, Instagram-worthy part of Dubai Design Week

DUBAI: Named after the Arabic word for “doors,” Abwab is an annual exhibition at Dubai Design Week, a creative fair that runs until Nov. 17.

This year, five pavilions from Amman, Beirut, Dubai, the Eastern Provinces of KSA and Kuwait City are showing off their artistic innovations in Dubai Design District, where the event is based.

Two designers were invited from each place to collaborate and produce works related to the theme “Between the Lines.”

The creations are housed in five pavilions at the heart of Dubai Design District, made up of red twigs and newspaper pulp and designed by the firm Architecture + Other Things.

Visitors crowded around the pavilions at the opening of the fair on Tuesday and explored the five spaces with their unique, sometimes perplexing, offerings.

Amman‘s pavilion at the Abwab exhibit is called “Duwar,” roundabout in Arabic, and is described as a representation of the cycle between chaos and order. The exhibit is a walk-through piece featuring moving images on boards suspended from the low ceiling of the circular space. Visitors are encouraged to walk through the dark circular corridor and take in the constantly flashing imagery above them in the piece that was created by multidisciplinary designer Hashem Joucka and architect Basel Naouri.

Beirut’s contribution to the Abwab exhibit is called “Beirut Fillers” and features a series of suspended words in a constructed sensorial environment, complete with audio recordings of the words “euhhh,” “halla2,” “enno” and “fa,” all of which are linguistic fillers commonly heard in Beiruti conversation.  

For its part, the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia is showcasing a fascinating piece of work called “The Sound of the East Coast” that pays homage to the tradition of pearl diving in the area with shaking, jelly-like bowls. The installation even features audio recordings of the traditional song “El Yamal,” often chanted to keep the divers motivated.

While Kuwait City’s offering, called “Desert Cast,” uses locally sourced materials and production methods to explore the idea of identity in the country, Dubai’s piece at the exhibit is called “Thulathi: Threefold” and is marked by a protruding triangular section that breaks the natural form of the rounded pavilion. Each corner of the triangle opens slightly through apertures, revealing video projections and silhouette cutouts.

The Abwab exhibit is just one thought-provoking, Instagram-worthy part of Dubai Design Week, an event that boasts workshops, exhibits and a trade fair.