Trump says Kim has agreed to complete denuclearization of peninsula

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US President Donald Trump holds up a document signed by him and North Korea’s leader Kim Jong Un following a signing ceremony during their historic summit Singapore on Tuesday, June 12. (AFP)
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US President Donald Trump, right, and North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un, left, sign documents as US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, second right, and the North Korean leader's sister Kim Yo Jong, second left, look on during the signing ceremony on Tuesday, June 12. (AFP)
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North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un (L) shaking hands with US President Donald Trump (R) as they sit down for the historic US-North Korea summit. (AFP)
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US President Donald Trump shakes hands with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un at the Capella Hotel on Sentosa island in Singapore on Tuesday. (REUTERS)
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US President Donald Trump (R) gestures as he meets with North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un (L) at the start of their historic US-North Korea summit, at the Capella Hotel on Sentosa island in Singapore on June 12, 2018. (AFP)
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US President Donald Trump (R) gestures as he meets with North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un (L) at the start of their historic US-North Korea summit, at the Capella Hotel on Sentosa island in Singapore on June 12, 2018. (AFP)
Updated 13 June 2018
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Trump says Kim has agreed to complete denuclearization of peninsula

  • Despite being quizzed by journalists several times, Trump was unable to give a clear deadline or a clear process of denuclearization
  • Trump told reporters that both leaders will pay courtesy calls to each other’s respective countries “at the appropriate time”
SINGAPORE: US President Donald Trump has confirmed that North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has agreed to “an unwavering and complete denuclearization of the Korean peninsula,” although there is no clear deadline for nuclear disarmament.
He made the statement during a press conference at the Trump-Kim Summit in Singapore on Tuesday.
The summit at a luxury hotel on the island of Sentosa saw the two leaders expressing their commitment to “vigorous negotiations to implement the agreement as soon as possible” at their first meeting.
Despite being quizzed by journalists several times, Trump was unable to give a clear deadline or a clear process of denuclearization.
However, Trump said that North Korea had already destroyed a major missile engine testing site and that it has not had a nuclear test for the past seven months. “When he lands, he would start the denuclearization process right away,” Trump told reporters.
Keith Fitzgerald, negotiation and conflict management expert and managing director of Sea-Change Partners, commented: “The Trump White House has not shared much information about their plans. If the White House had a strategy, it’s not clear to most analysts what that strategy was.”
Professor James Chin, director of the Asia Institute at the University of Tasmania, agreed that the only strategy the denuclearization talks involved is “the willingness to compromise.”
“There will not be a comprehensive agreement, but it will be more like a roadmap to agreement, and perhaps a statement on the end of war,” added Prof. Chin.
Trump’s negotiating style is guided more by “his personal instincts” than by any strategy, added Fitzgerald. The Trump-Kim talks had gone from words about “complete, verifiable, irreversible denuclearization” to talk of making a good start, as the summit approached. Trump praised Kim for taking “the first bold step for a bright full future,” adding that the meeting with the North Korean leader was “honest, direct and productive.”
“He is very talented,” said Trump, adding that 26-year-old Kim was able to “run it tough.” North Korea is infamous for its human rights atrocities, including running a state-sanctioned gulag against its own citizens.
“He wants to do the right thing,” said Trump, adding that human rights were part of the discussion despite being discussed “relatively briefly”. In its 2018 report the Human Rights Watch described North Korea as “one of the most repressive authoritarian states in the world.”
Trump told reporters that both leaders will pay courtesy calls to each other’s respective countries “at the appropriate time.”
“It is a strange thing to see an American president have better relationships with North Korea and Russia than with Germany and Canada,” Fitzgerald told Arab News.
Before Trump’s press conference took place, a sleek, propaganda video resembling a big-budgeted Hollywood trailer was shown hailing Trump and Kim as heroes who would “advance” North Korea.
The video was made by a Los Angeles-based, award-winning production house Destiny Pictures, and commissioned by the US government.


Sudanese policeman dies from wounds after protesters stone vehicle

Updated 19 min 30 sec ago
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Sudanese policeman dies from wounds after protesters stone vehicle

KHARTOUM: A Sudanese policeman has died from his wounds after protesters threw stones at a police vehicle passing close to demonstrations in the capital Khartoum, a police spokesman said on Friday.
The vehicle was passing the area by chance late on Thursday, the spokesman said, adding that a number of suspects had been arrested.
The case brings the official death toll during protests that have spread since Dec. 19 across Sudan to 32, including three security personnel. An opposition-linked doctors’ syndicate said last week that 57 people had been killed in the protests.
“The vehicle was pelted with stones, and they were police returning from training and had no link to the dispersal of the unrest,” said police spokesman Hashem Ali.
Security forces dispersed protests close to the presidential palace in Khartoum on Thursday, rounding up several dozen of them and driving them away in pick up trucks, witnesses said.
On Friday police fired teargas to disperse hundreds of people who protested after leaving a mosque in Omdurman, across the Nile from central Khartoum, witnesses said.
The protesters had blocked a road with stones and branches chanting, “Down, that’s it!,” “Freedom, peace and justice,” and “The people’s choice is revolution.”
The protests were triggered by a deepening economic crisis and have become the most sustained popular challenge to President Omar Al-Bashir since he took power in a coup nearly 30 years ago.
The president and his ruling National Congress Party have shown no sign of bowing to demands to quit and have blamed the unrest on unnamed foreign agents.