‘Incredibles 2’ set to break more records for Disney

Updated 13 June 2018
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‘Incredibles 2’ set to break more records for Disney

  • Experts are predicting a $140 million-plus opening weekend

LOS ANGELES: After a glut of lucrative box office juggernauts from its Marvel Cinematic Universe, Disney is looking to break more records with “Incredibles 2,” the long-awaited return of a quirky animated superhero family.
The film — which comes out Friday, a full 14 years after “The Incredibles” — looks set to score the highest debut ever for an animated film at the North American box office.
Experts are predicting a $140 million-plus opening weekend for Brad Bird’s sequel to his own hugely popular original, which would surpass the $135 million debut of its Disney-Pixar stablemate, “Finding Dory” (2016).
“For a very long time, people have been wanting this film,” Samuel L. Jackson, who returns as superhero Frozone, told reporters at last week’s glittering premiere in Hollywood.
“I think people who saw the film at a certain age have had kids now, and they’re showing them (the original) so they can bring them to this one.”
In the latest adventure, Parr family matriarch Helen (Holly Hunter) is called upon to help bring the world’s hiding superheroes back into the open, while husband Bob (Craig T. Nelson) navigates the day-to-day heroics of being a homemaker.
Their children Violet (Sarah Vowell) and Dash (Huck Milner) are back again, along with baby Jack-Jack, whose devastating super powers are about to be unleashed.
It all goes a bit awry — as it always does — when a new villain emerges with a brilliant and dangerous plot that threatens the world.


Opening the door to Middle Eastern designers at Dubai Design Week

Updated 14 November 2018
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Opening the door to Middle Eastern designers at Dubai Design Week

  • This year, five pavilions from Amman, Beirut, Dubai, the Eastern Provinces of KSA and Kuwait City are showing off
  • The Abwab exhibit is just one thought-provoking, Instagram-worthy part of Dubai Design Week

DUBAI: Named after the Arabic word for “doors,” Abwab is an annual exhibition at Dubai Design Week, a creative fair that runs until Nov. 17.

This year, five pavilions from Amman, Beirut, Dubai, the Eastern Provinces of KSA and Kuwait City are showing off their artistic innovations in Dubai Design District, where the event is based.

Two designers were invited from each place to collaborate and produce works related to the theme “Between the Lines.”

The creations are housed in five pavilions at the heart of Dubai Design District, made up of red twigs and newspaper pulp and designed by the firm Architecture + Other Things.

Visitors crowded around the pavilions at the opening of the fair on Tuesday and explored the five spaces with their unique, sometimes perplexing, offerings.

Amman‘s pavilion at the Abwab exhibit is called “Duwar,” roundabout in Arabic, and is described as a representation of the cycle between chaos and order. The exhibit is a walk-through piece featuring moving images on boards suspended from the low ceiling of the circular space. Visitors are encouraged to walk through the dark circular corridor and take in the constantly flashing imagery above them in the piece that was created by multidisciplinary designer Hashem Joucka and architect Basel Naouri.

Beirut’s contribution to the Abwab exhibit is called “Beirut Fillers” and features a series of suspended words in a constructed sensorial environment, complete with audio recordings of the words “euhhh,” “halla2,” “enno” and “fa,” all of which are linguistic fillers commonly heard in Beiruti conversation.  

For its part, the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia is showcasing a fascinating piece of work called “The Sound of the East Coast” that pays homage to the tradition of pearl diving in the area with shaking, jelly-like bowls. The installation even features audio recordings of the traditional song “El Yamal,” often chanted to keep the divers motivated.

While Kuwait City’s offering, called “Desert Cast,” uses locally sourced materials and production methods to explore the idea of identity in the country, Dubai’s piece at the exhibit is called “Thulathi: Threefold” and is marked by a protruding triangular section that breaks the natural form of the rounded pavilion. Each corner of the triangle opens slightly through apertures, revealing video projections and silhouette cutouts.

The Abwab exhibit is just one thought-provoking, Instagram-worthy part of Dubai Design Week, an event that boasts workshops, exhibits and a trade fair.