Jordan charity gathers hotel leftovers to feed poor

Children wait for meals provided through the initiative, Family Kitchen, which packages excess foods from five-star hotels to underprivileged families during the holy month of Ramadan, in Al-Baqaa Palestinian refugee camp, near Amman, Jordan, June 11, 2018. (Reuters)
Updated 13 June 2018
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Jordan charity gathers hotel leftovers to feed poor

  • A team of volunteers collect unwanted food from lavish Ramadan buffets
  • Bandar Sharif began his ‘Family Kitchen’ initiative 10 years ago

AMMAN: At the end of a lavish Ramadan buffet in the banquet hall of one of Amman’s five-star hotels, a young Jordanian charity worker rushes to gather up left-over food that his team of volunteers will package and redistribute to needy families.
Bandar Sharif began his ‘Family Kitchen’ initiative 10 years ago, angered by the amount of food thrown away by hotels during the Muslim fasting month of Ramadan, traditionally a period when consumption levels double across the region.
“What we do is eliminate this waste, we salvage the food and provide it to people who are in desperate need of it,” said Sharif, a 33-year-old teacher.
His team of volunteers now works all year round to collect unwanted food from large wedding parties, bakeries and restaurants.
This year the initiative has focused on the Palestinian refugee camp of Baqaa, one of the depressed areas in a country that has seen some of the biggest protests in years this month over steep price hikes, which are backed by the International Monetary Fund.
Critics say the price hikes are to blame for rising poverty in Jordan.
Family Kitchen’s initiative this year provides ‘iftar’ meals — eaten by Muslims after sunset during the holy month of Ramadan — to 500 families in the impoverished refugee camp on the outskirts of Amman.
A third of the camp’s 120,000 residents have an income below the national poverty line and around 17 percent are unemployed, the UN refugee body says.
“Our families are very poor, there is a lot of poverty in the community, so they need this support, they need these meals in order to ensure that they have food the next day,” said Kifah Khamis, who runs a charity in the sprawling camp.
One camp resident, Um Thair, a mother of four, said she could not have coped without the meals delivered to her family.
“I was able to save money. During Ramadan I didn’t have to buy a lot of food or shop a lot, we got most of our meals from the charity, we would come everyday and get our iftar meal,” she said.


Camel racing: An Arabian sport loved by the region’s people

Updated 14 August 2018
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Camel racing: An Arabian sport loved by the region’s people

  • Camel racing is among the most famous traditional sports in the Arab world
  • The camels that take part in races are known as “Thaluls” in Arabic

RIYADH: Camel racing is among the most famous traditional sports in the Arab world, which even dates back to the pre-Islamic era, when tribes organized the races to show off the strong camels they owned.
The races continued during the subsequent Islamic era, promoting the practicing of equestrian sports and bravery.
Prophet Muhammad’s companions were known for camel racing.
The camels that take part in races are known as “thaluls” in Arabic, or riding camels.
Among the most famous ones are: Thalul Al-Hurra (aka The Free Camel), as well as those from central and northern the Arabian Peninsula, such as Aseela, from the Thalul Al-Hurra breed, and the Omani Thaluls, known for being a graceful, slim and noble type of camels.
And the Sudanese Thaluls, which are known for the strength and patience and adapting to the challenging desert conditions.
The camels are known for their tolerance to thirst and traveling longer distances than horses.
Though camels are slightly slower than horses, some types of camels have traveled distances on speed that exceeds those of horses, as good camels can travel 40 kilometers continuously in one hour.
Good racing camels are known for specific characteristics that distinguish them from other camels, such as light weight, small palms, large chest size, long legs and long tail.
Racing camels undergo a special diet to help them get rid of excess fats, and the most important foods they feed on are dates, milk, honey, dry grass and corn.