Operation to take Hodeidah essential for Yemenis, security of Red Sea waterway: Saudi Ambassador in DC

File photo showing Saudi Arabian ambassador to the United States Prince Khalid bin Salman arrives on Capitol Hill in Washington, US, July 24, 2017. (Reuters)
Updated 13 June 2018
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Operation to take Hodeidah essential for Yemenis, security of Red Sea waterway: Saudi Ambassador in DC

LONDON: Prince Khalid bin Salman bin Abdul Aziz, the saudi ambassador to Washington said in a tweet on his Twitter account that “the coalition operations to liberate the city of Hodeidah are a continuation of the support delivered by the Saudi-led Arab coalition for Yemeni people, and a way to support the freedom of Yemenis against the militia supported by Iran bent on sowing chaos and destruction in the country.

Yemeni forces on Wednesday got closer to Hodeidah after taking control of the suburb of Nekheila south of the town and port of Hodeidah as part of a new operation called ‘Golden victory’ aimed to liberate Hodeidah and its port.

The Saudi Ambassador to Washington added in a separate tweet that the saudi-led Arab coalition operations to re-take Hodeidah are important in light of the increased threat the militias controling the port of Hodeidah have been posing for maritime security in the Red Sea,
which the ambassador added is a vital waterway through which 15% of world trade pass annually as well as regional trade and commerce.

Prince Khaled added that Iran backed Houthi militia have launched repeated attacks on commercial and military ships belonging to Saudi Arabia, the UAE and the US


Japan worker’s pay docked for taking lunch 3 minutes early

Updated 1 min 59 sec ago
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Japan worker’s pay docked for taking lunch 3 minutes early

TOKYO: A Japanese city official has been reprimanded and fined for repeatedly leaving his desk during work hours — but only for around three minutes to buy lunch.
The official, who works at the waterworks bureau in the western city of Kobe, began his designated lunch break early 26 times over the space of seven months, according to a city spokesman.
“The lunch break is from noon to 1 pm. He left his desk before the break,” the spokesman said on Thursday.
The official, 64, had half a day’s pay docked as punishment and the bosses called a news conference to apologize.
“It’s deeply regrettable that this misconduct took place. We’re sorry,” a bureau official told reporters, bowing deeply.
The worker was in violation of a public service law stating that officials have to concentrate on their jobs, according to the bureau.
The news sparked a heated debate on Japanese social media, with many defending the official.
“It’s sheer madness. It’s crazy. What about leaving your desk to smoke?” said one Twitter user.
“Is this a bad joke? Does this mean we cannot even go to the bathroom?” said another.
The city had previously suspended another official in February for a month after he had left his office numerous times to buy a ready-made lunch box during work hours.
The official was absent a total of 55 hours over six months, according to the city.