Court orders Spain king’s brother-in-law to jail in five days

Former Olympic handball player and husband of Spain’s Princess Cristina, Inaki Urdangarin leaves the courthouse in Palma de Mallorca, on the Spanish Balearic Island of Mallorca on June 13, 2018. (AFP)
Updated 13 June 2018
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Court orders Spain king’s brother-in-law to jail in five days

  • Husband of Princess Christina has been sentenced to five years and 10 months in jail
  • The graft case tainted the royal family’s image

PALMA: A Spanish court has given the king’s brother-in-law, Inaki Urdangarin, five days to report to jail after he lost his appeal against a graft conviction and prison sentence, a judicial source said Wednesday.
The former Olympic handball player and husband of Princess Christina has been sentenced to five years and 10 months in jail in a case which caused uproar in Spain and tainted the royal family’s image.
The 50-year-old had been found guilty last year of embezzling millions of euros (dollars) between 2004 and 2006 from a non-profit foundation he headed on the island of Majorca.
On Wednesday, Urdangarin flew from Switzerland where he lives in exile with his family to Majorca to appear in court.
At the Palma courthouse he was met by a horde of journalists and some people who shouted “thief” at him, an AFP photographer reported.
Urdangarin will now be jailed in the next few days unless he makes a successful final appeal to the Constitutional Court — a possibility regarded as unlikely.
The graft case sparked outrage during Spain’s financial crisis when Urdangarin came to be seen as a symbol of the elite’s perceived corruption.
The scandal contributed to the decision of King Felipe VI’s father Juan Carlos I to abdicate in 2014.


Zambia probes mine dump collapse that killed 10

Updated 20 min 33 sec ago
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Zambia probes mine dump collapse that killed 10

  • Zambia’s mining minister Richard Musukwa blamed the incident, which also left seven people injured, on “people who should not have been in the mine,” describing them as “illegal miners or scavengers.”
  • Ministers were forced to step in last month after small-scale miners at the site began using explosives to extract copper from the mine dump, damaging nearby properties and possibly dislodging the mound.

LUSAKA: Zambia’s mining minister Richard Musukwa announced an investigation on Thursday after 10 people died during the collapse of a mine dump in the country’s copper-producing region.
The subsistence miners were killed on Wednesday when the dump known locally as Black Mountain collapsed in Zambia’s second-largest city and mining hub Kitwe.
Musukwa told parliament “the investigations are still underway and we have suspended operations at the Black Mountain to allow for a forensic investigation.”
Musukwa blamed the incident, which also left seven people injured, on “people who should not have been in the mine,” describing them as “illegal miners or scavengers.”
Local media reported that ministers were forced to step in last month after small-scale miners at the site began using explosives to extract copper from the mine dump, damaging nearby properties and possibly dislodging the mound.
Zambia has some of the world’s largest copper reserves and the metal accounts for as much as 80 percent of the country’s export earnings.
Growing demand for copper has seen prices spike above $3.14 (€2.74) for a pound, according to the InfoMine service.
This has contributed to a surge in illegal mining activity in Zambia which is beset by high levels of unemployment.
Communications and power cables have become a valuable target, both for major gangs and small-time thieves both in Zambia and worldwide.