Peace without Borders announces first Saudi peace ambassador

Dr. Sumaya Al-Nasser is Saudi Arabia’s first internationally certified female life and career coach. (Social media photo)
Updated 14 June 2018
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Peace without Borders announces first Saudi peace ambassador

  • Peace Without Borders promotes the values of peace, supports sustainable development, monitors violations of human rights of expression and freedom and works on achieving the Millennium Development Goals set by the UN member states.

JEDDAH: The global organization Peace Without Borders has chosen Dr. Sumaya Al-Nasser to be the first Saudi ambassador for peace. She is a distinguished Saudi life coach and businesswoman with long experience in coaching since 2003.

Al-Nasser is Saudi Arabia’s first internationally certified female life and career coach. She has a doctorate in theology, and started to explore and deepen her study of awareness sciences at an early age.

The organization, represented by its chairman Mohamed Al-Arab, contacted Al-Nasser to give her the news. “At first, I was very hesitant and took a long time to make a decision; however, my understanding of the high values of the organization was the main reason why I decided to go through this experience,” Al-Nasser told Arab News.

“I think it is a responsibility rather than an honor,” she added. “It means I have a lot of responsibilities to take in order to deliver and promote the idea of peace and acceptance to everyone I can reach in my community,” she said.

Peace Without Borders promotes the values of peace, supports sustainable development, monitors violations of human rights of expression and freedom and works on achieving the Millennium Development Goals set by the UN member states.

 

Al-Nasser was chosen to be the peace ambassador because of her thoughts and principles of peace, freedom, coexistence, and respect, which she presents through her books, programs, courses and the content she shares through social media. 

Based in Los Angeles, she launched her project Sumaya369, and delivers courses in Arabic to thousands of clients worldwide. She helps her audience to improve inner peace and self-relationships though one-on-one sessions, classes and group seminars, as well as online coaching sessions. She also uses social media for the same purpose and has wide popularity. 

Al-Nasser is the author of three books and many articles in which she encourages readers to have a positive and “aware” way of life and provides them with the right methods to reach that goal. Earlier this year, Al-Nasser launched the first Arabic guided meditation CD, “The Back Door.” 

It features 14 tracks that teach meditation practices, with music written by Jordanian film composer and pianist Ghiya Rushida.

Al-Nasser said: “Peace isn’t just the absence of war and violence, it is the ability to manage conflict positively.

“For this, Peace Without Borders has been doing incredible work around the world, and I’m happy to be a part of the organization and to contribute toward my homeland.”

FASTFACTS

Sumaya Al-Nasser is Saudi Arabia’s first internationally certified female life and career coach. She has over 15 years of experience in coaching. She has launched the first-ever Arabic guided meditation CD.


Hodeidah offensive: Coalition forces seize weapons supplied by Iran to Houthis

Arab coalition spokesman Col. Turki Al-Maliki speaks during a press conference in Riyadh. (AN photo by Bashir Saleh)
Updated 56 min 58 sec ago
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Hodeidah offensive: Coalition forces seize weapons supplied by Iran to Houthis

  • The arsenal included drones, a sniper rifle, roadside bombs disguised as rocks and even a “drone boat” which had been filled with explosives that failed to detonate.
  • Equipment used to produce and load fuel for rockets that target Saudi Arabia contained Iranian labels.

JEDDAH: Saudi-led coalition officials on Tuesday displayed weapons and explosives supplied by Iran to Houthi militias in the Yemeni port city of Hodeidah. 

The arsenal included drones, a sniper rifle, roadside bombs disguised as rocks and even a “drone boat” which had been filled with explosives that failed to detonate.

Equipment used to produce and load fuel for rockets that target Saudi Arabia contained Iranian labels. The weapons were captured on the battlefield in Hodeidah and displayed at a military base in the UAE. 

“Unsurprisingly, there are advanced military components in the Houthi militias’ hands,” said Talal Al-Teneiji, an official at the UAE Foreign Ministry.

“We took time to inspect and disassemble these to figure out the source ... and we can say that these elements are military-grade materials imported from Iran to the Houthi militias.”

As the week-long offensive in Hodeidah intensified on Tuesday, coalition forces consolidated their grip on the city’s airport and there was new fighting on the main coast road leading to the city center, with Apache helicopters providing air support to the coalition. 

“We can hear the sounds of artillery, mortars and sporadic machinegun fire. The Houthis have been using tanks,” one civilian on the coastal strip said. 

“Water has been cut off to many of the areas near the corniche area because the Houthis have dug trenches and closed water pipes.”

At the airport, which the coalition has controlled since Saturday, their forces stormed the main compound and took full command.

UAE Minister of State for Foreign Affairs Anwar Gargash said: “We are waiting for the Houthis to realize the sort of military and psychological blow that they got with the airport ... we are giving them time to decide if they want to save the city ... and pull out.”

Oubai Shahbandar, a strategic communications adviser, told Arab News that “without the sea and airport of Hodeidah, the Houthi militia has effectively lost the war.”

They should agree to UN-hosted peace talks and not prolong the fighting. “The tide in this conflict has clearly turned in favor of the Arab coalition and the welfare of the Yemeni people ought to be paramount,” he said.