Streisand gives early nod of approval to Lady Gaga’s ‘Star’

Streisand is giving an early thumbs-up to the fourth version of the romance between a rising young performer and a fading one. (Invision/AP)
Updated 14 June 2018
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Streisand gives early nod of approval to Lady Gaga’s ‘Star’

LOS ANGELES: Barbra Streisand’s “A Star Is Born” is being reborn online with scenes she’d cut from the 1976 movie.

Long known as a perfectionist, Streisand tinkered with the film to restore an exchange between the star-crossed lovers played by her and Kris Kristofferson and an instrumental take on the Oscar-winning tune “Evergreen.”

The romantic drama, coming to Netflix along with other Streisand projects, isn’t the only “Star” on the horizon: A new version with Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper will be in theaters this fall.

Streisand is giving an early thumbs-up to the fourth version of the romance between a rising young performer and a fading one, which Cooper directed.

“What I saw of it was very good,” Streisand said. “It’s just it feels reminiscent of mine, but they added some new things which I liked, too. ... I’m sure it’ll work.”

The original 1930s film starred Janet Gaynor and Fredric March, with Judy Garland and James Mason in the 1950s remake.

Streisand’s revised “Star” will be available on Netflix as part of a deal that includes her 1960s TV specials “My Name Is Barbra,” “Color Me Barbra” and “Barbra Streisand: A Happening in Central Park,” among other projects. Release dates were not announced.


What We Are Reading Today: The Philosopher, the Priest, and the Painter

Updated 28 min 11 sec ago
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What We Are Reading Today: The Philosopher, the Priest, and the Painter

In the Louvre museum hangs a portrait that is considered the iconic image of René Descartes, the great 17th-century French philosopher. 

And the painter of the work? The Dutch master Frans Hals — or so it was long believed, until the work was downgraded to a copy of an original. But where is the authentic version, and who painted it? Is the man in the painting — and in its original — really Descartes?

A unique combination of philosophy, biography, and art history, The Philosopher, the Priest, and the Painter investigates the remarkable individuals and circumstances behind a small portrait.

Through this image — and the intersecting lives of a brilliant philosopher, a Catholic priest, and a gifted painter — Steven Nadler opens a fascinating portal into Descartes’s life and times, skillfully presenting an accessible introduction to Descartes’s philosophical and scientific ideas, and an illuminating tour of the volatile political and religious environment of the Dutch Golden Age.

 As Nadler shows, Descartes’s innovative ideas about the world, about human nature and knowledge, and about philosophy itself, stirred great controversy. Philosophical and theological critics vigorously opposed his views, and civil and ecclesiastic authorities condemned his writings. Nevertheless, Descartes’s thought came to dominate the philosophical world of the period, and can rightly be called the philosophy of the 17th century.

 Shedding light on a well-known image, The Philosopher, the Priest, and the Painter offers an engaging exploration of a celebrated philosopher’s world and work.

Steven Nadler is the William H. Hay II professor of Philosophy at the University of Wisconsin — Madison. His books include Rembrandt’s Jews, which was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize; Spinoza: A Life, which won the Koret Jewish Book Award; and A Book Forged in Hell: Spinoza’s Scandalous Treatise and the Birth of the Secular Age (Princeton).